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A Gray wolf (Canis lupus). Stian Olsen / Flickr

By Elizabeth Claire Alberts

The California condor has been teetering on the brink of extinction for decades. When the species was first assessed in 1994 for the IUCN Red List, the global authority on the conservation statuses of species, it was listed as "critically endangered." Nearly 30 years later, its status has not changed. But this doesn't tell the whole story.

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Two vaquitas surfacing for air in the Sea of Cortez. NOAA

By Elizabeth Claire Alberts

The Mexican government will no longer protect the habitat of the critically endangered vaquita in the Upper Gulf of California, but has opened the area up to fishing, according to a news report.
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Mint Images - Tim Robbins / Mint Images RF / Getty Images

While solar energy has plenty of benefits, there are also high upfront costs associated with installing a home renewable energy system. So, at the end of the day, are solar panels worth it?

If you want to minimize your ecological impact while reducing or even eliminating monthly utility bills, solar panels may be well worth the money. But they may not be the best solution for every home. In this article, we'll review solar panel costs, longevity and return on investment to help you decide whether they're right for you.

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Carcass of a turtle lies on the sand that was washed ashore at the beach of Mount Lavinia, south of Sri Lanka's capital Colombo on June 24, 2021. ISHARA S. KODIKARA / AFP via Getty Images

By Malaka Rodrigo

Up to 100 turtles and 20 dolphins have washed up dead on Sri Lanka's beaches in the past month, as experts fear a link to the leak of toxic chemicals from a sunken freight ship.

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A juvenile North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) breaches as a bulk carrier ship passes near the entrance to St. John's River in Florida in 2006. The species is one of the world's most endangered whales, with fewer than 400 individuals now alive. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, NOAA Research Permit #775-1600-10 via Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Claudia Geib

In the 1980s, video of dolphins dying in fishing nets sparked a public boycott of tuna and the development of "dolphin-safe" labeling programs for canned tuna that have become ubiquitous in many countries. Now, one organization wants to use that model to protect whales from collisions with ships.

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One of the captive otters that will be released into Iberá National Park. Image courtesy of Rewilding Argentina

Ten days ago, Sebastian di Martino was kayaking along the Bermejo River in Argentina's Impenetrable National Park when he heard a splash. He looked around and saw a brown-furred animal swimming through the water, occasionally dipping below the surface and then reappearing. It was a giant river otter (Pteronura brasiliensis), a species believed to be extinct in Argentina.

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A heron in the Galapagos. Rhett A. Butler

A coalition of groups, including a newly formed organization backed by actor Leonardo DiCaprio, have mobilized $43 million for efforts to restore degraded habitats in the Galápagos Islands, an archipelago renowned for its endemic species and central role in scientists' understanding of ecology and evolution.

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Cocos Island Atoll in the Indian Ocean, part of the Cocos (Keeling) Islands group. PalawanOz / Wikimedia Commons

The Australian government has moved to create two new marine protected areas that cover an expanse of ocean twice the size of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.

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Palm fruits stored on the road in Tomé-Açu municipality, northern Amazon's Pará state, on Nov. 12, 2019. Karla Mendes / Mongabay

During 18 months, Mongabay investigated allegations challenging the "sustainable" status of the Brazilian palm oil supply chain, revealing impacts including deforestation and water contamination, and what appears to be an industry-wide pattern of brazen disregard for Amazon conservation and for the rights of Indigenous people and traditional communities in northern Pará state.

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Eating mass-produced food grown with synthetic fertilizers is changing hair, nails and bones. d3sign / Getty Images

By Malavika Vyawahare

"Tell me what you eat, and I shall tell you what you are," the French lawyer Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin wrote in his 1826 opus, Physiologie du Goût. This is quite literally the case, scientists decoding the human body have found.

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Burning forest in Rondonia in 2020. Fabio Nascimento

Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon surged during the month of April, ending a streak of three consecutive months where forest clearing had been lower than the prior year. The rise in deforestation came despite a high-profile pledge from Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro to rein in deforestation in Earth's largest rainforest.

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Redwood trees in California. Rhett A. Butler
On Thursday, the Biden Administration formally laid out its vision for conserving 30% of America's land and waters by 2030.
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Scientists estimate that only one in every 1,000 eggs survive to maturity. Carol_Ann_Peacock / Getty Images

By Marlowe Starling

Clear-skied, low-wind summer days are rare off the coast of California. But they're a blessing if you're a researcher tracking down critically endangered leatherback sea turtles.

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