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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life
The recovery of elephant seals is one of the "signs of hope" that scientists say show the oceans can recover swiftly if we let them. NOAA / CC BY 2.0

The challenges facing the world's oceans are well known: plastic pollution could crowd out fish by 2050, and the climate crisis could wipe out coral reefs by 2100.

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By Fino Menezes

Everyone adores dolphins. Intelligent, inquisitive and playful, these special creatures have captivated humans since the dawn of time. But dolphins didn't get to where they are by accident — they needed to develop some pretty amazing superpowers to cope with their environment.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The deep, open ocean may seem like an inhospitable environment, but many species like human-sized Humboldt squids are well-adapted to the harsh conditions. 1,500 feet below the ocean's surface, these voracious predators could be having complex conversations by glowing and changing patterns on their skin that researchers are just beginning to decipher.

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A blue shark in the Channel Islands off California. NOAA SWFSC/Flickr

By Jasmin Graham

Blue sharks are among the widest-ranging shark species in the oceans. We know this partly because from 1962 to 2013, 117,962 blue sharks were tagged as part of the ongoing Cooperative Shark Tagging Program.

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Petrochemicals are rapidly becoming the largest driver of global oil consumption. Stas_V / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Ajit Niranjan

As wind farms, solar plants and electric cars threaten demand for fossil fuels, oil and gas executives are betting big on another environmental vice: plastic.

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Branching staghorn coral, acropora, is completely bleached during the 2017 coral bleaching event on the Great Barrier Reef. Picture was taken on Pixie Reef. Brett Monroe Garner / Moment / Getty Images

The Great Barrier Reef, a natural wonder that once teemed with life, just experienced a major coral bleaching event, according to scientists who conducted aerial surveys over hundreds of individual reefs, as The Guardian reported.

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If you are worried about herring worm, just cut your piece of sushi in half before eating it. Nandaro / CC BY-SA 3.0

The population of a marine parasite that sometimes worms its way into sushi has increased by 283 times in the last nearly 40 years, a University of Washington (UW)-led study has found.

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A girl holds balloons with origami paper cranes before releasing them in central Kiev, Ukraine as part of Chernobyl 20th anniversary commemorations on April 26, 2006. DENIS SINYAKOV / AFP via Getty Images

By Lara O'Brien and Shannon Brines

Balloons are often seen as fun, harmless decorations. But they become deadly litter as soon as they are released into the air and forgotten.

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Bekah Nelson / Florida Fish and Wildlife (CC BY 2.0)

By David Shiffman

Let's go fishin'! After all, a lone angler fishing from a dock or a few friends going out to sea can't have all that much of an effect on fish populations … right?

Think again.

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International Monetary Fund / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Sir David Attenborough wants a ban on deep-sea mining.

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Researchers have discovered one reason why ocean plastic is so dangerous for turtles: To them, it smells like food. AugustineChang / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Sea turtles became the face of the plastic pollution crisis when a video of a turtle with a plastic straw stuck up its nose went viral in 2015.

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