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Find the Closest EV Charging Station to Your Home

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Find the Closest EV Charging Station to Your Home

Plug-in electric vehicle (EV) users in the U.S. have 6,601 public stations where they can charge their cars.

Good thing, since year-to-date EV sales are up by a monstrous 447.95 percent compared to this time last year, EV Obsession reported.

Also, the National Auto Dealers Association predicted that EV prices would drop by 30 percent this year.

EVs still represent a small fraction of auto sales in the country with just 33,617 sales, but could become a central factor in years to come even if the market continues to expand by one-quarter of the current pace. The government continues to support the industry by providing a tax credit for new buyers, while large utilities like NRG are investing in the industry by opening new charging stations.

If you're considering a Nissan LEAF, Tesla, Chevy Volt or any other model, you'll want to know where you can charge it away from home. This U.S. Department of Energy map shows all 6,601 locations—from dense states like California to Montana, where there are fewer stations than you have fingers on your hand. 

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