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100+ Arrested in London Extinction Rebellion Protests

Climate
Climate change demonstrators gather in Parliament Square during climate change protests in central London, on April 15. Robin Pope / NurPhoto / Getty Images

More than 100 people were arrested during ongoing climate change protests in London that brought parts of the British capital to a standstill, police said Tuesday.


Demonstrators had started by blocking off a bridge and major central road junctions on Monday at the start of a civil disobedience campaign that also saw action in other parts of Europe.

The protests were organized by the campaign group Extinction Rebellion, which was established last year in Britain by academics and has become one of the world's fastest-growing environmental movements.

Metropolitan Police in London said that by early Tuesday 113 adults had been arrested.

That number includes three men and two women who were arrested at the UK offices of energy company Royal Dutch Shell on suspicion of criminal damage. Campaigners daubed graffiti and smashed a window at the Shell Centre building.

A protester glued herself to the Shell building.

picture-alliance / dpa / empics / J. Brady

The majority of people arrested were held for breaching public order laws and blocking a highway.

The protest saw more than a thousand people block off central London's Waterloo Bridge and lay trees in pots along its length. Later, people set up camps in Hyde Park in preparation for further demonstrations throughout the week.

Protesters Demand Action 

Police have ordered protesters to confine themselves to a zone within Marble Arch, a space at the junction of Hyde Park, the Oxford Street main shopping thoroughfare and the Park Lane street of plush hotels.


Mother and daughter climate protesters at Marble Arch in London.

picture-alliance / dpa / empics / S. Parsons

"The information and intelligence available at this time means that the Met (police) feels this action is necessary in order to prevent the demonstrations from causing ongoing serious disruption," the police said.

The climate protesters want governments to declare a climate and ecological emergency, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2025, halt biodiversity loss and be led by new "citizens' assemblies on climate and ecological justice."

Spokesman for the protesters James Fox said the group had attempted to maintain a blockade overnight at four sites in central London before the police came to impose the new restriction.

People were arrested "mostly at Waterloo Bridge where the police came to try to stop everyone, but there were too many of us", he told AFP.

Fox said the protesters attached themselves to vehicles and to each other using bicycle locks.

"We have no intention of leaving until the government listens to us," he said. "Many of us are willing to sacrifice our liberty for the cause."

Reposted with permission from our media associate Deutsche Welle.

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