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EVENT: Panel Discussion on U.S. EPA's Carbon Pollution Standard

Climate
EVENT: Panel Discussion on U.S. EPA's Carbon Pollution Standard

Audubon Ohio

WHAT: Panel Discussion on U.S. EPA's Carbon Pollution Standard

WHEN: Wednesday, June 6, 6 - 8 p.m.

WHERE: Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Rare Book Room, 1 Wade Oval, Cleveland, Ohio 44106

Audubon Ohio, Environmental Health Watch, Environment Ohio, coalition partners and a panel of public health and policy experts is hosting a discussion on the impacts of climate change and air pollution on the Cleveland area with local residents.

The panel will highlight the federal policies currently being proposed and how Cleveland area residents can make their voices heard to demand a clean and healthy future for our children and families. Comments and questions from the audience will be a critical component of the citizens’ hearing.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently proposed the first ever carbon pollution rules for power plants. Climate change has real and imminent health consequences for this region, a region that consistently ranks in the nation’s top 20 for poor air quality.

The discussion will focus on what the new proposed U.S. EPA rules mean for Cleveland and the health and well-being of our region.  

Panelists inlcude:

John W. McLeod, RS, MPH
Director, Environmental Health Services
Cuyahoga County Board of Health

Ellen M. Wells, PhD, MPH, MEM
Postdoctoral Scholar
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Department of Environmental Health Sciences

David Beach
Director, GreenCityBlueLake Institute
Cleveland Museum of Natural History

Leanne M. Jablonski FMI, PhD
Ohio Coordinator, Union of Concerned Scientists
Director, Marianist Environmental Education Center (MEEC)
 
Nathan Willcox
Federal Global Warming Program Director
Environment America

For more information, contact Marnie Urso at 216-246-7150 or [email protected].

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