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EcoWatch TV Featuring New Fracking Documentary + Filmmakers Joshua Pribanic and Melissa Troutman

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EcoWatch TV Featuring New Fracking Documentary + Filmmakers Joshua Pribanic and Melissa Troutman

EcoWatch

Join Stefanie Spear on EcoWatch TV via Google Hangout on Thursday, Jan. 3 at 7 p.m. as she interviews filmmakers Joshua Pribanic and Melissa Troutman about the truth behind oil and gas development in shale plays across Pennsylvania. Their new documentary, Triple Divide, is scheduled for release at the end of January.

Through personal stories, experts and public documents, Triple Divide tells a cautionary tale about the consequences of fracking, including contamination of water, air and land; intimidation and harassment of citizens; loss of property, investments and standard of living; weak and under enforced state regulations; decay of public trust; illness; fragmentation of Pennsylvania's last stands of core forest; and lack of protection over basic human rights.

The film begins at one of only four triple continental divides on the North American continent in Potter County, Pennsylvania, where everything is downstream. From this peak, rain is sent to three sides of the continent—the Gulf of St. Lawrence in Canada, Chesapeake Bay on the eastern seaboard and the Gulf of Mexico. This vast water basin is drained by three major rivers—the Allegheny, Genesee and Susquehanna. These waterways rank among the most coveted trout streams in the U.S., helping to create a regenerative tourism economy upon which locals have depended for generations. At this “watershed moment” in Pennsylvania’s history, which way will the future flow?

Be sure to join our live Google Hangout to hear firsthand the account of these two extraordinary filmmakers as they unfold the truth about fracking’s undeniable impacts on local communities and our most valuable natural resources.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

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