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Divest!

Energy

Bill McKibben

Greetings from the Do The Math tour bus!

We’re bouncing up the road to Madison, WI right now after another sold-out show in Chicago last night.

As you might already know, one of the goals of this tour is to launch a new fossil fuel divestment campaign at colleges and universities across the country—it's a critical way to fight back against corporate polluters.

Here’s how you can help:

If you’re a current student, click here to join or start a campaign on your campus on our brand new website: gofossilfree.org.

If you’re an alumnus/alumna, click here to tell us where you went to school and join the national campaign. We’ll be in touch soon about how you can connect with and support students at your alma mater.

And if you're not a student or an alum, don't worry—there will be lots for everyone to do in the weeks ahead.

Why divestment? Well, we know that fossil fuel companies are principally concerned about two things: their bottom line and their public image. A nationwide movement forcing our schools to divest from fossil fuels will deal a serious blow to both.

More than 100 campuses have already joined the divestment campaign, and it’s generating real excitement everywhere we go. From big schools like the University of Wisconsin to small colleges like Middlebury, the campaign is picking up speed. At Harvard, a student resolution supporting divestment just passed with 72 percent of the vote!.

Now, it’s absolutely crucial that we keep the momentum going—click here to get involved.

Visit EcoWatch’s ENERGY page for more related news on this topic.

 

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