Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Dirty Energy Money Behind the Push to Frack California

Fracking

A satirical online video featuring Gov. Brown (D-CA) was released yesterday by Oil Change International, highlighting the Governor's penchant for fracking and dirty energy campaign donations. The video is the latest from the Big Oil Brown campaign effort which is pushing for a ban on fracking in California.

The video parody, Frack Water, portrays a Gov. Brown look-alike outside a southern California oil field accompanied by an oil industry representative in a shot-for-shot remake of the 2004 Stetson cologne advertisement starring Matthew McConaughey.

In the video the narrator says, “In a land plagued by drought, one man stands tall … We won’t tell you what’s in it, but Big Oil Brown’s got it all over him … Jerry Brown’s frackwater. A fragrance that smells like a man … a man who doesn’t give a [bleep] about drought or climate change.” 

Big Oil Brown 

Oil Change International, in their new campaign, has outlined massive contributions from the oil industry to the Governor and other elected officials in recent years. The review shows that Gov. Brown has accepted at least $2,014,570.22 from fossil fuel interests since his race for Attorney General in 2006.

Amongst other revelations (such as, who is behind initiatives like Proposition 30 as well as the Governor's charter schools), the analysis shows Gov. Brown is already collecting for his 2014 re-election bid. There are still months until the primary and already Big Oil has made some big contributions:

  • Occidental has given $27,200—the maximum legally allowed.
  • Edison and Chevron have both given $27,200 TWICE, once for the primary election and another for the general election—a nice little loophole that lets them double their effective contribution limit.
  • Phillips 66, another oil company, has nearly maxed out with a $25,000 contribution.

The running total for just these four companies stands at $161,000 as of now for the 2014 election cycle.

“You can’t buy back your legacy, Governor, even with all that Big Oil cash,” David Turnbull, campaigns director for Oil Change International said. “California is on the brink of climate catastrophe and fracking up the state will help push it over the edge. Californians deserve better than to be beholden to Big Oil’s desires and befouled by their stench.”

As the public awakens to the dangers of fracking in California—including water scarcity concerns, environmental pollution and public health impacts—it is becoming increasingly obvious that Gov. Brown is being influenced by an industry that cares only about profit, not what’s best for Californians.

The video and analysis come just before a major mobilization in Sacramento, CA, planned for March 15, where thousands of anti-fracking activists from around the state are expected to join in protest.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A protest against the name of the Washington Redskins in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Nov. 2, 2014. Fibonacci Blue / CC BY 2.0

The Washington Redskins will retire their controversial name and logo, the National Football League (NFL) team announced Monday.

Read More Show Less
The survival tools northern fish have used for millennia could be a disadvantage as environmental conditions warm and more fast-paced species move in. Istvan Banyai / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Alyssa Murdoch, Chrystal Mantyka-Pringle and Sapna Sharma

Summer has finally arrived in the northern reaches of Canada and Alaska, liberating hundreds of thousands of northern stream fish from their wintering habitats.

Read More Show Less
A mother walks her children through a fountain on a warm summer day on July 12, 2020 in Hoboken, New Jersey. Gary Hershorn / Getty Images

A heat wave that set in over the South and Southwest left much of the U.S. blanketed in record-breaking triple digit temperatures over the weekend. The widespread and intense heat wave will last for weeks, making the magnitude and duration of its heat impressive, according to The Washington Post.

Read More Show Less
If you get a call from a number you don't recognize, don't hit decline — it might be a contact tracer calling to let you know that someone you've been near has tested positive for the coronavirus. blackCAT / Getty Images

By Joni Sweet

If you get a call from a number you don't recognize, don't hit decline — it might be a contact tracer calling to let you know that someone you've been near has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Read More Show Less
Aerial view of burnt areas of the Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia state, Brazil, on Aug. 24, 2019. CARLOS FABAL / AFP via Getty Images

NASA scientists say that warmer than average surface sea temperatures in the North Atlantic raise the concern for a more active hurricane season, as well as for wildfires in the Amazon thousands of miles away, according to Newsweek.

Read More Show Less
A baby receives limited treatment at a hospital in Yemen on June 27, 2020. Mohammed Hamoud / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Oxfam International warned Thursday that up to 12,000 people could die each day by the end of the year as a result of hunger linked to the coronavirus pandemic—a daily death toll surpassing the daily mortality rate from Covid-19 itself.

Read More Show Less

Trending

The 2006 oil spill was the largest incident in Philippine history and damaged 1,600 acres of mangrove forests. Shubert Ciencia / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Jun N. Aguirre

An oil spill on July 3 threatens a mangrove forest on the Philippine island of Guimaras, an area only just recovering from the country's largest spill in 2006.

Read More Show Less