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Thousands Unite in Solidarity With Standing Rock

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Thousands of people protested in North Dakota and outside Army Corps of Engineers offices, banks and energy companies in different parts of the country after indigenous leaders and climate activists called for a national "day of action."

Protesters in DC were joined by Sen. Bernie Sanders outside the White House who asked the government to cancel the Dakota Access Pipeline's permit.

"All across the country, we are bringing the proverbial fires of the Oceti Sakowin to the doors of the U.S. Army Corps, demanding action to stop this bakken oil pipeline," Dallas Goldtooth, "Keep It in the Ground" organizer with Indigenous Environmental Network, said. "Now is the time for the White House administration and its Department of Army to support Indigenous rights and sovereignty by rescinding the pipeline permits and ordering a full EIS. We all stand in solidarity with Standing Rock, because we know this is a fight worth winning."

Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the pipeline, filed papers in federal court Tuesday, in an attempt to override the delay caused by the Army Corps of Engineers' Monday decision to get more input from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe before proceeding with construction.

"When elders at Standing Rock asked people from around the country to turn out in support of their campaign, I knew that people around the country would answer their call," Bill McKibben, cofounder of 350.org, said. "Their encampment is the moral center of the continent right now, and it's good to have some of that spirit across the nation today."

For a deeper dive:

News: Reuters, NBC, Columbia Missourian, InsideClimate News, AP, New York Times, The Hill, Bloomberg Businessweek, NPR, Mashable, CW55, Bellingham Herald, ThinkProgress

Commentary: The Inquirer, Will Bunch column

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

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