Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Thousands Unite in Solidarity With Standing Rock

Popular
Thousands Unite in Solidarity With Standing Rock

Thousands of people protested in North Dakota and outside Army Corps of Engineers offices, banks and energy companies in different parts of the country after indigenous leaders and climate activists called for a national "day of action."

Protesters in DC were joined by Sen. Bernie Sanders outside the White House who asked the government to cancel the Dakota Access Pipeline's permit.

"All across the country, we are bringing the proverbial fires of the Oceti Sakowin to the doors of the U.S. Army Corps, demanding action to stop this bakken oil pipeline," Dallas Goldtooth, "Keep It in the Ground" organizer with Indigenous Environmental Network, said. "Now is the time for the White House administration and its Department of Army to support Indigenous rights and sovereignty by rescinding the pipeline permits and ordering a full EIS. We all stand in solidarity with Standing Rock, because we know this is a fight worth winning."

Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the pipeline, filed papers in federal court Tuesday, in an attempt to override the delay caused by the Army Corps of Engineers' Monday decision to get more input from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe before proceeding with construction.

"When elders at Standing Rock asked people from around the country to turn out in support of their campaign, I knew that people around the country would answer their call," Bill McKibben, cofounder of 350.org, said. "Their encampment is the moral center of the continent right now, and it's good to have some of that spirit across the nation today."

For a deeper dive:

News: Reuters, NBC, Columbia Missourian, InsideClimate News, AP, New York Times, The Hill, Bloomberg Businessweek, NPR, Mashable, CW55, Bellingham Herald, ThinkProgress

Commentary: The Inquirer, Will Bunch column

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

Four more years will be enough to cement in place Trump's anti-environmental policies and to make sure it's too late to really change course. Enrique Meseguer / Pixabay

By Bill McKibben

To understand the planetary importance of this autumn's presidential election, check the calendar. Voting ends on November 3—and by a fluke of timing, on the morning of November 4 the United States is scheduled to pull out of the Paris Agreement.

President Trump announced that we would abrogate our Paris commitments during a Rose Garden speech in 2017. But under the terms of the accords, it takes three years to formalize the withdrawal. So on Election Day it won't be just Americans watching: The people of the world will see whether the country that has poured more carbon into the atmosphere than any other over the course of history will become the only country that refuses to cooperate in the one international effort to do something about the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A woman marks down her vote on a ballot for the Democratic presidential primary election at a polling place on Super Tuesday, March 3, 2020 in Herndon, Virginia. Samuel Corum / Getty Images

By Oliver Milman

The climate crisis is set to be a significant factor in a U.S. presidential election for the first time, with new polling showing a clear majority of American voters want decisive action to deal with the threats posed by global heating.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A black bear cub climbs a tree at Tongass National Forest in Alaska. sarkophoto / iStock / Getty Images Plus

America's largest national forest, Tongass National Forest in Alaska, will be opened up to logging and road construction after the Trump administration finalizes its plans to open up the forest on Friday, according to The New York Times.

Read More Show Less
Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg protests in front of the Swedish Parliament in Stockholm on September 25, 2020. Jonathan Nackstrand / AFP / Getty Images

By Ruby Russell and Ajit Niranjan

Hamstrung by coronavirus lockdowns, frustrated school strikers have spent months staging digital protests against world leaders failing to act urgently on climate change.

Read More Show Less

This fall brings three new environmental movies. David Attenborough: A Life On Our Planet | Official Trailer

This week marks the official start of fall, but longer nights and colder days can make it harder to spend time outdoors. Luckily, there are several inspiring environmental films that can be streamed at home.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch