Quantcast

Bill Nye Defends Climate Beliefs, Faces Bullying Claims on CNN

Climate

Does believing in climate change and taking it seriously make one a bully?

Aside from proving the facts through examples of droughts, rising waters and impacted crops, that's a question Bill Nye, “The Science Guy," had to ponder as part of a brief discussion this week on CNN's "Crossfire" with social justice and environmental activist Van Jones and conservative commentators S.E. Cupp and Nick Loris.

Loris felt the need to began his statement by saying he was not a denier or a skeptic, which Cupp believes indicates just how on edge some people have become in this debate. They must have fallen victim to intimidation, she says.

"The scare tactics have not worked—don't you need public consensus to move the needle on this," Cupp asked after displaying March data showing that just 36 percent of the public believes that global warming poses a serious threat to their way of life.

With a couple bewildred glares, table poundings and utterance of the phrase, "hurricane-schmurricane,'" Nye may not have defended himself against the bullying critique too well. Still, he makes his point more than effectively, even if the passive denial of climate change aggravated him a bit. 

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

Watch Bill Nye the Science Guy Debate Congresswoman Who Claims Climate Change is ‘Unproven’

White House’s Alarming Climate Change Study Calls For ‘Urgent Action’

Bill Nye ‘The Science Guy’ and Michael Mann Explain The Difference Between Climate and Weather on MSNBC

——–

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Participants of the climate demonstration Fridays for Future walk through Hamburg, Germany on Feb. 21, 2020. Axel Heimken / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

U.S.-based youth climate activists on Friday drew attention to the climate protest in Hamburg, Germany, where organizers said roughly 60,000 people took part, and hoped that Americans took inspiration from their European counterparts.

Read More
Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) surfacing, showing the remains of a blow and its mottled appearance near South Georgia Island in the Polar Regions. Mick Baines & Maren / Getty Images

The largest animal on Earth is proving that wildlife protections work.

Read More
Sponsored
A pipeline that ruptured in Mississippi Saturday, forcing hundreds to evacuate. Yazoo County Emergency Management Agency

More than 300 people were forced to evacuate and 46 were sent to the hospital after a gas pipeline ruptured in Mississippi Saturday.

Read More
Pexels

By Tim Lydon

Climate-related disasters are on the rise, and carbon emissions are soaring. Parents today face the unprecedented challenge of raising children somehow prepared for a planetary emergency that may last their lifetimes. Few guidebooks are on the shelves for this one, yet, but experts do have advice. And in a bit of happy news, it includes strategies already widely recognized as good for kids.

Read More
Pexels

Be it Nina Simone and James Brown for civil rights, Joni Mitchell and Marvin Gaye for the environment, or Jackson Browne and Buffalo Springfield for nuclear disarmament, musicians have long helped push social movements into the limelight.

Read More