Quantcast

Ben Carson Says He Doesn't Believe in Climate Change or Evolution

Climate

If it weren't such an incredibly pressing issue, it would be comical how Republican presidential candidates have responded to the simple question "Do you believe in climate change?"

At a campaign event on Wednesday at the University of New Hampshire, Ben Carson was asked: "You don't believe in evolution or climate change, I believe. And I was just wondering, do you seriously not believe that climate change is happening?"

In responding to the question, Carson gives the tired conservative trope "the climate is always changing" before digressing into how he doesn't have "enough faith" to believe in the Big Bang Theory and eventually musing "gravity, where did it come from?"

Carson, a retired neurosurgeon, has been repeatedly ridiculed for his comments on climate change, not to mention his comments on sexuality and other issues.

Rebecca Leber at New Republic sums it up well:

For a neurosurgeon, Carson has some profoundly unscientific views on politically charged topics. He frames science as no more than a religious system he has the freedom to reject. “I just don't have that much faith," he said. "But they are welcome to believe whatever they want to believe. I'm welcome to believe what I want to believe.” Using this logic, no subject is safe from his scrutiny: Climate science, evolution, even gravity.

According to a USA TODAY/Suffolk University Poll from Sept. 30, Carson is tied for second place with Carly Fiorina, who are both trailing behind Donald Trump. All three of the top GOP presidential candidates have no political experience and all three reject climate science.

Watch Carson's response here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Al Gore Blasts GOP Climate Deniers, Thom Hartmann Says Throw Them in Jail

How to Finance the Global Transition from Fossil Fuels to Renewable Energy

Iceland: World’s Largest Clean Energy Producer Per Capita

Yeb Saño Embarks on 930-Mile Walk From Rome to Paris Demanding World Leaders Take Climate Action

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

BLM drill seeders work to restore native grasses after wildfire on the Bowden Hills Wilderness Study Area in southeast Oregon, Dec. 14, 2018. Marcus Johnson / BLM / CC BY 2.0

By Tara Lohan

In 2017 the Thomas fire raged through 281,893 acres in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, California, leaving in its wake a blackened expanse of land, burned vegetation, and more than 1,000 destroyed buildings.

Read More Show Less
Brogues Cozens-Mcneelance / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Alina Petre, MS, RD

Fruit juice is generally perceived as healthy and far superior to sugary soda.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Danielle Nierenberg and Katherine Walla

As the holiday season ramps up for many across the world, Food Tank is highlighting 15 children's books that will introduce young eaters, growers and innovators to the world of food and agriculture. Authors and organizations are working to show children the importance — and fun — of eating healthy, nutritious and delicious food, growing their own produce, and giving food to others in need.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Alina Petre, MS, RD (CA)

Purple cabbage, also referred to as red cabbage, belongs to the Brassica genus of plants. This group includes nutrient-dense vegetables, such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and kale.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Lauren Wolahan

For the first time ever, the UN is building out a roadmap for curbing carbon pollution from agriculture. To take part in that process, a coalition of U.S. farmers traveled to the UN climate conference in Madrid, Spain this month to make the case for the role that large-scale farming operations, long criticized for their outsized emissions, can play in addressing climate change.

Read More Show Less