Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Ben Carson Says He Doesn't Believe in Climate Change or Evolution

Climate
Ben Carson Says He Doesn't Believe in Climate Change or Evolution

If it weren't such an incredibly pressing issue, it would be comical how Republican presidential candidates have responded to the simple question "Do you believe in climate change?"

At a campaign event on Wednesday at the University of New Hampshire, Ben Carson was asked: "You don't believe in evolution or climate change, I believe. And I was just wondering, do you seriously not believe that climate change is happening?"

In responding to the question, Carson gives the tired conservative trope "the climate is always changing" before digressing into how he doesn't have "enough faith" to believe in the Big Bang Theory and eventually musing "gravity, where did it come from?"

Carson, a retired neurosurgeon, has been repeatedly ridiculed for his comments on climate change, not to mention his comments on sexuality and other issues.

Rebecca Leber at New Republic sums it up well:

For a neurosurgeon, Carson has some profoundly unscientific views on politically charged topics. He frames science as no more than a religious system he has the freedom to reject. “I just don't have that much faith," he said. "But they are welcome to believe whatever they want to believe. I'm welcome to believe what I want to believe.” Using this logic, no subject is safe from his scrutiny: Climate science, evolution, even gravity.

According to a USA TODAY/Suffolk University Poll from Sept. 30, Carson is tied for second place with Carly Fiorina, who are both trailing behind Donald Trump. All three of the top GOP presidential candidates have no political experience and all three reject climate science.

Watch Carson's response here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Al Gore Blasts GOP Climate Deniers, Thom Hartmann Says Throw Them in Jail

How to Finance the Global Transition from Fossil Fuels to Renewable Energy

Iceland: World’s Largest Clean Energy Producer Per Capita

Yeb Saño Embarks on 930-Mile Walk From Rome to Paris Demanding World Leaders Take Climate Action

Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

The wildfires that roared through Eastern Washington in September had a devastating impact on an extremely endangered species of rabbit.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A protestor in NYC holds up a sign that reads, "November Is Coming" on June 14, 2020 in reference to voting in the 2020 presidential election. Ira L. Black / Corbis / Getty Images

By Mark Hertsgaard

What follows are not candidate endorsements. Rather, this nonpartisan guide aims to inform voters' choices, help journalists decide what races to follow, and explore what the 2020 elections could portend for climate action in the United States in 2021 and beyond.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Activists fight a peat fire in Siberia in September. ALEXANDER NEMENOV / AFP via Getty Images

The wildfires that ignited in the Arctic this year started earlier and emitted more carbon dioxide than ever before.

Read More Show Less
A metapopulation project in South Africa has almost doubled the population of cheetahs in less than nine years. Ken Blum / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Tony Carnie

South Africa is home to around 1,300 of the world's roughly 7,100 remaining cheetahs. It's also the only country in the world with significant cheetah population growth, thanks largely to a nongovernmental conservation project that depends on careful and intensive human management of small, fenced-in cheetah populations. Because most of the reserves are privately funded and properly fenced, the animals benefit from higher levels of security than in the increasingly thinly funded state reserves.

Read More Show Less
A new super enzyme feeds on the type of plastic that water and soda bottles are made of, polyethylene terephthalate (PET). zoff-photo / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Scientists are on the brink of scaling up an enzyme that devours plastic. In the latest breakthrough, the enzyme degraded plastic bottles six times faster than previous research achieved, as The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch