Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

At the Deserts Edge

Climate

Expanding deserts are taking a heavy toll on the lives and livelihoods of many in the world's most populous nation, China. In Kulun Qi, a dry area in northeastern Inner Mongolia, attempts have been made to stop, and maybe even reverse, the danger. At the Desert's Edge, by filmmaker Kit Gillet and part of the Action4Climate video competition, documents the trials and tentative successes of a collaborative effort between locals, governmental initiatives and NGOs fighting to combat China's growing deserts by planting a vast barrier of a million trees.

“The international community must find ways to secure the long-term resilience not only for ecosystems, but also for people and for the poor who are the most affected by desertification,” said Mahmoud Mohieldin, Corporate Secretary and the President’s Special Envoy for the MDGs, in his opening remarks.

“To address the unique issues faced by the most vulnerable, we must invest in applicable solutions that are transformative, and can be scaled up.”

The 2014 World Day to Combat Desertification global observance event took place June 17 at World Bank headquarters in Washington, DC. It focused on the theme of ecosystem-based adaptation, with a rallying call “Land Belongs to the Future—Let’s Climate Proof It.”

Approximately 400 representatives from government, intergovernmental and civil society organizations registered for the event. The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification organized the event, which was hosted by the World Bank in partnership with the Global Environment FacilityTerrAfrica and Connect4Climate.

The Action4Climate video competition received more than 230 entries from 70 countries from students inspired to share their climate change stories. To watch other Action4Climate videos, click here.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

The World, ‘It Turned Out Right’

‘Vanishing World’ Explores the Realities of Climate Refugees

The Impacts of Sea Level Rise on Indigenous Communities in Panama

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Food Tank

By Danielle Nierenberg and Alonso Diaz

With record high unemployment, a reeling global economy, and concerns of food shortages, the world as we know it is changing. But even as these shifts expose inequities in the health and food systems, many experts hope that the current moment offers an opportunity to build a new and more sustainable food system.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Brian J. Love and Julie Rieland

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the U.S. recycling industry. Waste sources, quantities and destinations are all in flux, and shutdowns have devastated an industry that was already struggling.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Kris Gunnars, BSc

Unhealthy foods play a primary role in many people gaining weight and developing chronic health conditions, more now than ever before.

Read More Show Less
A man pushes his mother in a wheelchair down Ocean Drive in South Beach, Miami on May 19, 2020, amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. reported more than 55,000 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, in a sign that the outbreak is not letting up as the Fourth of July weekend kicks off.

Read More Show Less
To better understand how people influence the overall health of dolphins, Oklahoma State University's Unmanned Systems Research Institute is developing a drone to collect samples from the spray that comes from their blowholes. Ken Y. / CC by 2.0

By Jason Bruck

Human actions have taken a steep toll on whales and dolphins. Some studies estimate that small whale abundance, which includes dolphins, has fallen 87% since 1980 and thousands of whales die from rope entanglement annually. But humans also cause less obvious harm. Researchers have found changes in the stress levels, reproductive health and respiratory health of these animals, but this valuable data is extremely hard to collect.

Read More Show Less

Sunscreen pollution is accelerating the demise of coral reefs globally by causing permanent DNA damage to coral. gonzalo martinez / iStock / Getty Images Plus

On July 29, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed into law a controversial bill prohibiting local governments from banning certain types of sunscreens.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Oat milk is popping up at coffee shops and grocery stores alike, quickly becoming one of the trendiest plant-based milks. jacqueline / CC by 2.0

By Kelli McGrane

Oat milk is popping up at coffee shops and grocery stores alike, quickly becoming one of the trendiest plant-based milks.

Read More Show Less