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Al Gore Endorses a Penguin for Congress

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Al Gore Endorses a Penguin for Congress
Campaign poster designed by Shepard Fairey. The Climate Reality Project

Sunday's dire report from the United Nations is not just a wake-up call for governments around the world to fight catastrophic climate change, it urges individual action as well.

On Tuesday, former Vice President Al Gore helped launch a new get-out-the-vote initiative to get youngsters to register and to back green policies and candidates at the polls.


The Earth for America project features an animated emperor penguin named "Earth" who is running for Congress. The mascot's Gore-approved platform includes renewable energy, clean energy jobs, electric vehicles, land conservation, health, and clean air and water.

"Earth knows that young people have the power to change the world," Gore, who chairs The Climate Reality Project, said in a press release sent to EcoWatch. "I'm so inspired by the passionate and dedicated young leaders who are getting involved and making their voices heard. It's crucial that this energy is translated into votes this November."

Iconic graphic artist Shepard Fairey's Studio Number One created the official campaign portrait in his signature style.

The Climate Reality Project

The Earth For America campaign—a partnership between The Climate Reality Project, MAL\FOR GOOD, TBWA\Chiat\Day and The Mill—also released an official announcement video featuring Earth (voiced by actress, host and digital content creator Liza Koshy).

"As a young, registered voter, Earth's perspective, message and relatable tone resonates with me," Koshy said in the press release. "She stands for issues that hit home (literally) for us all. I encourage everyone to use their platform, as Earth does, to ensure their voice is heard. You don't have to be a cute penguin running for Congress, but you DO have to VOTE."

Follow Earth's campaign train on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

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