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A Page Out of the Climate Change Handbook

Climate

 

Here’s a page from a climate change handbook, Earth Calling:

Rather than looking at the crises we face as issues on a to-do list, we need to see beneath the words to the real messages trying to get through to us. We as a culture are unmatched at assembling facts and events into a mosaic of a condition-at-large and taking it on with hard work and a can-do attitude. We have giant hearts and giving and compassionate natures. Why isn’t this enough to motivate us to look more deeply, to make sense of this, and to demand change of our leaders and ourselves?

To begin to answer this, we need to understand how different this challenge is from anything we have ever faced before. We need to see this as a call to our spirits to awaken and look at the earth and our relationship to her differently. And we need to understand where things have come apart, where we are broken, and why and how we can fix ourselves, each other, and the conditions that are harming our planet.

We can all take a leaf out of Ellen Gunter and Ted Carter’s Earth Calling: A Climate Change Handbook—to see the interconnectedness of all things, understand the deeper truths about climate change and discover a roadmap for finding our own call to action.

Gunter, climate activist, journalist and spiritual director, talks with the Green Divas about finding her own calling and how people can make a difference on an individual basis.

A presenter with the Climate Reality Project, Gunter has often heard “Well what should I do?” While acknowledging that not all activists are willing to get arrested, she highlights the fact that we  all have something that’s speaking to us, that each of us can be proactive in unique ways.

Described as the Silent Spring for the twenty-first century, Earth Calling is a handbook for action that invites us to reestablish our connection with nature while repairing our damaged environment. In other words, it is "an examination of what is happening in our world and how we can fix it, collectively and individually, by reconnecting with the earth that nurtures us on a spiritual—not just a physical—level."

We can make the connection between spirit, nature and Earth. Each one of us has an Earth calling. What’s yours?

 

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