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7 Reasons President Obama Is Concerned About Climate Change

Climate

President Obama toured the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida, yesterday, getting briefed on the upcoming Atlantic hurricane season, which begins on June 1. Afterwards, he fielded questions about climate change on Twitter, using his new Twitter account.

He opens with some advice on how to take on climate denial in Congress.  

The president even took on the controversial topic of Arctic drilling, which he has been called out for supporting despite his concern about climate change. He got more than 30 questions about Arctic drilling, according to The Washington Post.

Responding in three tweets, POTUS explained how he has shut off the most sensitive areas of the Arctic to drilling, including Bristol Bay. Also, in April the Obama administration dedicated most of Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge as wilderness, preventing drilling across roughly 12 million acres of northeastern Alaska, reports Think Progress. But, ultimately, President Obama thinks Arctic drilling can't be stopped completely.  

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The president also took the opportunity to show he's a fan of the pope and his stance on climate change.

He also explained how climate change is a national security threat.

He hit on how much we've expanded renewable energy, but cautioned we need more research and development and regulatory incentives to keep growing the sector.

He even talked about how to approach the subject of climate change in a classroom setting.

And when asked if big polluters like China and Brazil should be doing more, he said we should all be doing more and the U.S. should be taking the lead.

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