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5 Endangered Species Dependent on Public Lands for Survival

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By Anna Kramer

Think about our national parks. What comes to mind? Many of us think of spectacular landscapes, family adventures and, of course, incredible wildlife.

These places we love are all of those things, but they are also places created to protect and restore wildlife. Our national parks, wildlife refuges and other wild public lands provide crucial habitat for wildlife, especially endangered species.

The National Wildlife Federation is part of a coalition of more than 40 outdoor and sportsmen's organizations calling upon candidates seeking public office this November to pledge to protect our public lands and the wildlife that call these places home. Thousands of friends of wildlife have already pledged to protect our wild public lands and wildlife—and urged candidates and politicians to do the same.

Endangered species don't have representatives in Congress: They need you to speak for them. Take action and ask political leaders and candidates to pledge to protect our public lands!

Meet five of the many incredible endangered species and the public lands they call home.

1. Black-Footed Ferret

2. Whooping Crane

3. Sierra Nevada Bighorn Sheep

4. Piping Plover

5. Hawaiian Monk Seals


These are only five of the thousands of threatened and endangered species reliant on our nation's public lands. Whether their habitat is primarily found on a wildlife refuge, a national park or forest, or other wild public lands the sale or transfer or our public lands could be devastating for some of the most vulnerable wildlife in the U.S.

With only weeks to go before the November election this is an issue too important to ignore. Urge our political leaders and candidates to pledge to protect our wild public lands.

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