Quantcast

4 Things That Can Happen If You Quit Eating Dairy

Food

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the average American consumes 36 pounds of cheese, 200 pounds of milk and cream and 24 pounds of ice cream or frozen dairy products annually. But what benefits do dairy products provide in the first place? The dairy industry touts bone health and calcium, but research suggesting dairy helps bone health is weak at best. If you are deficient in calcium, there are plenty of non-dairy calcium sources, including kale, collard greens, tempeh and beans.

There may be some health reasons to reduce or cut dairy out completely.

On the other hand, there may be some health reasons to reduce or cut dairy out completely. What happens to your body when you go cold turkey on dairy?

1. Fewer Zits

Excluding dairy products could make you less prone to getting acne. According to research from Dartmouth Medical School, milk has testosterone-like hormones, which may stimulate oil glands in the skin and contribute to breakouts.

2. Better Digestion, Less Gas

Nearly two-thirds of the world’s population has a hard time digesting milk, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. This varies with ethnic groups from mild to severe lactose intolerance. If you have an intolerance to lactose, cutting out dairy could reduce bloating, flatulence, diarrhea and stomach cramps says the NHS.

3. Reduced Cancer Risk

Swedish researchers found women who drink more than one glass of milk per day may double their risk of ovarian cancer. A Harvard study found men who consumed more than two daily dairy servings had a 34 percent increased risk of developing prostate cancer, compared with those who consumed little or no dairy.

4. Longer Life

According to a study published in the BMJ, each daily glass of milk elevated mortality risk by 15 percent. Women who drank three or more glasses of milk per day were nearly twice as likely to die over the next two decades than those who drank less than one glass a day. The culprit: galactose, a simple milk sugar that induces oxidative stress and low-grade inflammation, often a precursor to disease.

In a YahooNews article, Julieanna Hever, MS, RD, CPT, a plant-based dietitian and author of The Vegiterranean Diet and The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Plant-Based Nutrition adds that abstaining from dairy could reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity and most other chronic diseases. That because most dairy products contain saturated fats, cholesterol-hormones and steroids.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

8 Health Benefits of Coconut Water

The Zero-Calorie ‘Miracle’ Noodle

Bananas: Are They Fattening or Will They Help You Lose Weight?

13 Ways to Stop Mindless Eating

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Individual standing in Hurricane Harvey flooding and damage. Jill Carlson / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Allegra Kirkland, Jeremy Deaton, Molly Taft, Mina Lee and Josh Landis

Climate change is already here. It's not something that can simply be ignored by cable news or dismissed by sitting U.S. senators in a Twitter joke. Nor is it a fantastical scenario like The Day After Tomorrow or 2012 that starts with a single crack in the Arctic ice shelf or earthquake tearing through Los Angeles, and results, a few weeks or years later, in the end of life on Earth as we know it.

Read More Show Less
A pregnant woman works out in front of the skyline of London. SHansche / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Air pollution particles that a pregnant woman inhales have the potential to travel through the lungs and breach the fetal side of the placenta, indicating that unborn babies are exposed to black carbon from motor vehicles and fuel burning, according to a study published in the journal Nature Communications.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

Teen activist Greta Thunberg delivered a talking-to to members of Congress Tuesday during a meeting of the Senate Climate Change Task Force after politicians praised her and other youth activists for their efforts and asked their advice on how to fight climate change.

Read More Show Less
Ten feet of water flooded 20 percent of this Minot, North Dakota neighborhood in June 2011. DVIDSHUB / CC BY 2.0

By Jared Brey

When Hurricane Michael tore through the Florida panhandle last October, it killed at least 43 people, caused an estimated $25 billion in damage and destroyed thousands of homes.

Read More Show Less
A protestor holds up her hand covered with fake oil during a demonstration on the U.C. Berkeley campus in May 2010. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

The University of California system will dump all of its investments from fossil fuels, as the Associated Press reported. The university system controls over $84 billion between its pension fund and its endowment. However, the announcement about its investments is not aimed to please activists.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Forest fire continues to blaze in Indonesesia on Sept. 18. WAHYUDI / AFP / Getty Images

Nearly 200 people have been arrested in Indonesia over their possible connections to the massive wildfires raging in the nation's forest, officials said this week.

Read More Show Less

By Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala

World leaders have a formidable task: setting a course to save our future. The extreme weather made more frequent and severe by climate change is here. This spring, devastating cyclones impacted 3 million people in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe. Record heatwaves are hitting Europe and other regions — this July was the hottest month in modern record globally. Much of India is again suffering severe drought.

Read More Show Less
Covering Climate Now / YouTube screenshot

By Mark Hertsgaard

The United Nations Secretary General says that he is counting on public pressure to compel governments to take much stronger action against what he calls the climate change "emergency."

Read More Show Less