Quantcast

4 Sources of Carbon Pollution That Would Dramatically Alter World's Climate

Climate

A new report, Dirty Fuels, Clean Futures, released today by the Sierra Club reveals four major potential sources of carbon pollution that, if developed, could dramatically alter the world's climate. Data shows that the oil, gas and coal from these potential sources, including the Arctic Ocean, Green River Formation, Powder River Basin and the Monterey, San Juan Basin and Marcellus shale plays, have the potential to release billions of tons of new carbon pollution into the atmosphere, more than negating positive climate actions taken by the Obama Administration.

Graphic courtesy of Sierra Club's Our Wild America campaign

"We can't keep burning fossil fuels and reduce climate pollution at the same time. It's common sense." said Michael Brune, Sierra Club Executive Director. "As this report demonstrates, real progress to fight climate disruption requires that dirty fuels be kept in the ground."

As the report details, developing just a fraction of the dirty energy in these major climate disrupters would cancel out the U.S.' greatest accomplishments in the fight against climate disruption—efforts like the Obama Administration's new fuel economy standards. Developing just one of these climate disrupters—the Arctic Ocean, for example would result in two-and-a-half times more pollution than would be saved by the new fuel economy standards.

Already, through administrative actions and by doubling down on clean energy, the Obama Administration has done more than any other to reduce carbon pollution. For the first time in 20 years, domestic carbon dioxide emissions are decreasing. An effective climate strategy however, requires that these steps be accompanied by efforts to leave dirty fuels in the ground. Several such pragmatic steps are outlined in the report.

The report calls on the Obama Administration to consider climate pollution, like other dangerous air and water pollution, before dirty energy projects move forward. It asks the President to close loopholes that allow the fossil fuel industry to benefit at the cost of Americans' health, environment and future; and it stresses that new energy projects and leasing should be focused on clean, not dirty, energy.

"Whether they are found beneath our public lands or next to our homes and schools, dirty fuels must be kept in the ground," said Dan Chu, senior director of the Sierra Club's Our Wild America campaign. "We should be taking advantage of available clean energy options that will create jobs, protect public health and fight climate disruption."

--------

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

100+ Scientists and Economists Urge President Obama and Secretary Kerry to Reject Keystone XL 

Watch Full First Episode of 'Years of Living Dangerously,' Showtime's Landmark Series on Climate Change

Tech Industry Can Ignite A Clean Energy Revolution  

--------

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Flat-lay of friends eating vegan and vegetarian Thanksgiving or Friendsgiving dinner with pumpkin pie, roasted vegetables, fruit and rose wine. Foxys_forest_manufacture / Royalty-free / iStock / Getty Images

Thanksgiving can be a tricky holiday if you're trying to avoid animal products — after all, its unofficial name is Turkey Day. But, as more and more studies show the impact of meat and dairy consumption on the Earth, preparing a vegan Thanksgiving is one way to show gratitude for this planet and all its biodiversity.

Read More Show Less
Residents wear masks for protection as smoke billows from stacks in a neighborhood next to a coal fired power plant on Nov. 26, 2015 in Shanxi, China. Kevin Frayer / Getty Images

While most of the world is reducing its dependence on coal-fired power because of the enormous amount of greenhouse gases associated with it, China raised its coal fired capacity over 2018 and half of 2019, according to a new study.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Children run on the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail in California. Bureau of Land Management

By Matt Berger

It's not just kids in the United States.

Children worldwide aren't getting enough physical activity.

That's the main conclusion of a new World Health Organization (WHO) study released Wednesday.

Read More Show Less

By Tim Ruben Weimer

Tanja Diederen lives near Maastricht in the Netherlands. She has been suffering from Hidradenitis suppurativa for 30 years. Its a chronic skin disease in which the hair roots are inflamed under pain — often around the armpits and on the chest.

Read More Show Less
Biosolids are applied to fallow wheat fields to build healthy soils at Boulder Park, Washington. King County

By Sarah Wesseler

Talk of natural climate solutions typically conjures up images of lush forests or pristine wetlands. But in King County, Washington, one important natural solution comes from a less Instagram-worthy source: the toilets of Seattle.

Read More Show Less