Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

150 New Yorkers Protest Fracking at the Office of Talisman Energy USA

Energy

Shaleshock Direct Action Working Group

Nearly 150 New York residents gathered today to peacefully protest the process of natural gas extraction, commonly known as fracking, at the regional offices of Talisman Energy USA in Big Flats, NY.

Demonstrators congregated in front of the Talisman office and delivered a statement to its CEO and president John Manzoni. The statement read, “Mr. Manzoni, these New York State residents will not stand by and allow our communities to be fractured and displaced, our drinking water poisoned and our land rendered unlivable. We will not be a sacrifice zone.”

Talisman refused to meet with the concerned residents, locking their doors and eventually calling law enforcement and refusing communication with event organizers.

Protesters, including a number of young children, carried signs highlighting Talisman's current number of violations at more than 300 and the problems with fracking fluid spills in neighboring Pennsylvania where fracking has been ongoing for several years.

Organizers of the event hope this protest sends a clear message to legislators, industry and fellow citizens that we don't want fracking in New York. This protest is just the first of a series of escalating direct actions planned for this summer which directly target industry, organizers said.

“Together, we will use our bodies as a source of strength, when our words are not being heard. Everywhere you drill a well, we will be there to stop it. When the first fracking truck drives to pour toxic chemicals into the ground, we will be there to block the road,” said an organizer of today's protest.

Ruth Young, a resident of Horseheads, NY, who also spoke at the action said, “Sometimes it is a lonely fight around here. It is wonderful to have the support of all of you who do know realities of this unsafe technology. You are willing to put your time, your energies, and your bodies on the line to fight those who are hell-bent on destroying the precious air, water and land we all share."

A recent New York Times article stated that Governor Cuomo is pursuing a policy that would allow fracking in a few of the most impoverished New York counties in the southwestern part of the state, including Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Steuben and Tioga. Community members and activists have been organizing the anti-fracking movement, which consists of hundreds of groups across the state. Currently, 79 New York towns have passed fracking bans, with another 71 working towards a ban.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, Louisiana has been converted to a 1,000-bed field hospital for coronavirus patients to alleviate stress on local hospitals. Chris Graythen / Getty Images

An area in Louisiana whose predominantly black and brown residents are hard-hit by health problems from industry overdevelopment is experiencing one of the highest death rates from coronavirus of any county in the United States.

Read More Show Less
A woman lies in bed with the flu. marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A central player in the fight against the novel coronavirus is our immune system. It protects us against the invader and can even be helpful for its therapy. But sometimes it can turn against us.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Several flower species, including the orchid, can recover quickly from severe injury, scientists have found. cunfek / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Calling someone a delicate flower may not sting like it used to, according to new research. Scientists have found that many delicate flowers are actually remarkably hearty and able to bounce back from severe injury.

Read More Show Less
A Boeing 727 flies over approach lights with a trail of black-smoke from the engines on April 9, 2018. aviation-images.com / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

With global air travel at a near standstill, the airline industry is looking to rewrite the rules it agreed to tackle global emissions. The Guardian reports that the airline is billing it as a matter of survival, while environmental activists are accusing the industry of trying to dodge their obligations.

Read More Show Less
A National Guard member works on election day at a polling location on April 7, 2020 in Madison, Wisconsin. Andy Manis / Getty Images.

ByJulia Baumel

The outbreak of COVID-19 across the U.S. has touched every facet of our society, and our democracy has been no exception.

Read More Show Less