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14 Stunning Nature Photos That Won Siena Contest From 15,000 Submissions

In only its first year, the Siena International Photo Awards contest has already become the Italian photo contest with the highest international participation ever with 15,000 submissions from more than 100 countries. Winners were announced on Oct. 31. These stunning images captured all over the globe vary from preying mantises looking like "smiling dancers" to a supercell at sunset.

Check out these remarkable photos here:

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