Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

13 States Receive $4 Million to Support Energy Efficiency

Business
13 States Receive $4 Million to Support Energy Efficiency

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Thirteen states received awards this week to help them advance energy efficiency through a range of projects across the U.S.

The U.S. Department of Energy announced a total of $4 million in awards that will support projects at public institutions, local governments and industrial sectors. The recipient states are Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Wisconsin.

Each state plans on retrofitting public buildings or advancing efficiency within particular industries or through policy. Some of the awardees fit into two of those three categories.

"Smart, cost-effective investments in energy efficiency are helping communities across the country cut energy waste and foster economic growth," said David Danielson, U.S. assistant secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. "Through the State Energy Program, states and local governments are leading by example—saving taxpayer dollars and curbing the effects of carbon pollution."

Here's a look at the projects that received the largest federal contributions from the $4 million pot:

  • Arkansas, $500,000. In collaboration with the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA), the state will strengthen policies and programs leading to more investments in the energy efficiency market, utilizing demonstrated best practices and innovative approaches. The state's cost share for the initiative is $111,226.
  • Mississippi, $500,000. The Mississippi Development Authority, also in partnership with SEEA, wants to support a statewide energy savings goal of at least 1 percent through utility energy efficiency programs and other means. The state is matching $125,000 of its award.
  • Tennessee, $426,644. The state will conduct educational outreach to local government and public housing authority leaders and provide technical assistance to individual communities and housing authorities to implement energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Partners on this project include Clean Energy Solutions Inc. and the Knoxville Community Development Corp.

In October, the DOE invested $60 million to support the research and development needed to expand the solar market through its Sunshot Initiative.

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

One of the beavers released into England's Somerset county this January, which has now helped build the area's first dam in more than 400 years. Ben Birchall / PA Images via Getty Images

England's Somerset county can now boast its first beaver dam in more than 400 years.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Australia's dingo fences, built to protect livestock from wild dogs, stretch for thousands of miles. Marian Deschain / Wikimedia

By Alex McInturff, Christine Wilkinson and Wenjing Xu

What is the most common form of human infrastructure in the world? It may well be the fence. Recent estimates suggest that the total length of all fencing around the globe is 10 times greater than the total length of roads. If our planet's fences were stretched end to end, they would likely bridge the distance from Earth to the Sun multiple times.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Hopi blue corn is being affected by climate change. Abrahami / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

Climate change is making ancient Hopi farming nearly impossible, threatening not just the Tribe's staple food source, but a pillar of its culture and religion, the Arizona Republic reports.

Read More Show Less
Pollution on the Ganges River. Kaushik Ghosh / Moment Open / Getty Images

The most polluted river in the world continues to be exploited through fishing practices that threaten endangered wildlife, new research shows.

Read More Show Less
Oil spills, such as the one in Mauritius in August 2020, could soon be among the ecological crimes considered ecocide. - / AFP / Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

An expert panel of top international and environmental lawyers have begun working this month on a legal definition of "ecocide" with the goal of making mass ecological damage an enforceable international crime on par with war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide.

Read More Show Less