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13 States Receive $4 Million to Support Energy Efficiency

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13 States Receive $4 Million to Support Energy Efficiency

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Thirteen states received awards this week to help them advance energy efficiency through a range of projects across the U.S.

The U.S. Department of Energy announced a total of $4 million in awards that will support projects at public institutions, local governments and industrial sectors. The recipient states are Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Wisconsin.

Each state plans on retrofitting public buildings or advancing efficiency within particular industries or through policy. Some of the awardees fit into two of those three categories.

"Smart, cost-effective investments in energy efficiency are helping communities across the country cut energy waste and foster economic growth," said David Danielson, U.S. assistant secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. "Through the State Energy Program, states and local governments are leading by example—saving taxpayer dollars and curbing the effects of carbon pollution."

Here's a look at the projects that received the largest federal contributions from the $4 million pot:

  • Arkansas, $500,000. In collaboration with the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA), the state will strengthen policies and programs leading to more investments in the energy efficiency market, utilizing demonstrated best practices and innovative approaches. The state's cost share for the initiative is $111,226.
  • Mississippi, $500,000. The Mississippi Development Authority, also in partnership with SEEA, wants to support a statewide energy savings goal of at least 1 percent through utility energy efficiency programs and other means. The state is matching $125,000 of its award.
  • Tennessee, $426,644. The state will conduct educational outreach to local government and public housing authority leaders and provide technical assistance to individual communities and housing authorities to implement energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Partners on this project include Clean Energy Solutions Inc. and the Knoxville Community Development Corp.

In October, the DOE invested $60 million to support the research and development needed to expand the solar market through its Sunshot Initiative.

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

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