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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

The Most Valued Anti-Poaching Equipment May Surprise You

Animals
An anti-poaching unit patrols in Kenya's Chyulu Hills. Charlie Shoemaker

By Heartie Look

In recent years, the battle against wildlife poaching in Africa has taken a high-tech turn. Night-vision goggles, body armor and unmanned aerial vehicles have all become part of the modern ranger armament. But for rangers on the ground, their actual requests are often more everyday—starting with a good pair of socks.

"It is not always the fancy kit that rangers need," said Keith Roberts, executive director for wildlife trafficking at Conservation International (CI). "It is rather the basics that can make all the difference."


In response to this need, CI partnered with Osom Brand, a clothing company specializing in sustainable goods, to donate 1,000 pairs of high-quality socks specifically designed for rangers protecting wildlife on the front lines in Africa. Like all Osom Brand products, the socks are made almost entirely from recycled clothing, a process that reduces waste and eliminates the need for water and toxic dyes.

Find out more about CI's partnerships that help rangers in the original post.

Heartie Look is a partner marketing manager at Conservation International.


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