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Which Is the Greenest College Campus in Your State?

Colleges across the U.S. have been making headlines for environmentally conscious polices and student activism. For example, the University of Dayton became the first U.S. Catholic college to divest from fossil fuels, Washington University students were arrested protesting Peabody Coal, and 130+ universities joined in a movement to measure the sustainable dining on campus.

There are numerous ways to judge how “green” a school is, including a close look at college campuses. eCollegeFinder has created a map illustrating the greenest college campuses in each state, as judged by College Prowler.

College Prowler ranked each school on a 1 to 10 scale, and while they did not disclose the criteria used, they summed up the motivation behind the rating system as follows: “These days, schools boast a high number of LEED-certified facilities and sustainability initiatives. The following colleges and universities are striving for a more eco-friendly future.”

Only one school received a perfect 10: Pitzer College in California.

See if your school made the list.

Click on map for a full sized image.

And, in case you’re a little rusty on college logos, here’s the breakdown of universities and College Prowler green campus ratings by state:

Alabama: Auburn University – 8.6

Alaska: University of Alaska Fairbanks – 8.05

Arizona: Northern Arizona University – 9.67

Arkansas: Hendrix College – 9.06

California: Pitzer College – 10

Colorado: University of Colorado Boulder – 9.8

Connecticut: Yale University – 9.36

Delaware: University of Delaware – 8.61

Florida: Florida Gulf Coast University – 9.8

Georgia: Emory University – 9.65

Hawaii: Chaminade University of Honolulu – 8.18

Idaho: Brigham Young University - Idaho – 8.45

Illinois: Loyola University Chicago – 9.21

Indiana: Ball State University – 9.11

Iowa: Iowa State University – 9.19

Kansas: University of Kansas – 8.43

Kentucky: Berea College – 8.73

Louisiana: Tulane University – 8.5

Maine: Bowdoin College – 9.54

Maryland: Goucher College – 9.47

Massachusetts: Smith College – 9.47

Michigan: Grand Valley State University – 9.47

Minnesota: Carleton College – 9.19

Mississippi: University of Mississippi – 8.5

Missouri: Washington University in St. Louis – 9.36

Montana: University of Montana – 8.7

Nebraska: Hastings College – 8.35

Nevada: Sierra Nevada College – 8.45

New Hampshire: University of New Hampshire – 8.8

New Jersey: Richard Stockton College of New Jersey – 8.71

New Mexico: University of New Mexico – 7.94

New York: Ithaca College – 9.42

North Carolina: Elon University – 9.41

North Dakota: University of North Dakota – 8.15

Ohio: Oberlin College – 9.31

Oklahoma: Oklahoma State University – 8.76

Oregon: University of Oregon – 9.67

Pennsylvania: Allegheny College – 9.19

Rhode Island: Brown University – 8.81

South Carolina: Furman University – 9.13

South Dakota: South Dakota School of Mines and Technology – 8.32

Tennessee: Vanderbilt University – 8.91

Texas: University of North Texas – 9.52

Utah: Westminster College – 9.14

Vermont: University of Vermont – 9.41

Virginia: James Madison University – 8.84

Washington: University of Washington – 9.46

West Virginia: West Virginia University – 8.02

Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point – 9.13

Wyoming: University of Wyoming – 8.38

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