Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Which Is the Greenest College Campus in Your State?

Colleges across the U.S. have been making headlines for environmentally conscious polices and student activism. For example, the University of Dayton became the first U.S. Catholic college to divest from fossil fuels, Washington University students were arrested protesting Peabody Coal, and 130+ universities joined in a movement to measure the sustainable dining on campus.

There are numerous ways to judge how “green” a school is, including a close look at college campuses. eCollegeFinder has created a map illustrating the greenest college campuses in each state, as judged by College Prowler.

College Prowler ranked each school on a 1 to 10 scale, and while they did not disclose the criteria used, they summed up the motivation behind the rating system as follows: “These days, schools boast a high number of LEED-certified facilities and sustainability initiatives. The following colleges and universities are striving for a more eco-friendly future.”

Only one school received a perfect 10: Pitzer College in California.

See if your school made the list.

Click on map for a full sized image.

And, in case you’re a little rusty on college logos, here’s the breakdown of universities and College Prowler green campus ratings by state:

Alabama: Auburn University – 8.6

Alaska: University of Alaska Fairbanks – 8.05

Arizona: Northern Arizona University – 9.67

Arkansas: Hendrix College – 9.06

California: Pitzer College – 10

Colorado: University of Colorado Boulder – 9.8

Connecticut: Yale University – 9.36

Delaware: University of Delaware – 8.61

Florida: Florida Gulf Coast University – 9.8

Georgia: Emory University – 9.65

Hawaii: Chaminade University of Honolulu – 8.18

Idaho: Brigham Young University - Idaho – 8.45

Illinois: Loyola University Chicago – 9.21

Indiana: Ball State University – 9.11

Iowa: Iowa State University – 9.19

Kansas: University of Kansas – 8.43

Kentucky: Berea College – 8.73

Louisiana: Tulane University – 8.5

Maine: Bowdoin College – 9.54

Maryland: Goucher College – 9.47

Massachusetts: Smith College – 9.47

Michigan: Grand Valley State University – 9.47

Minnesota: Carleton College – 9.19

Mississippi: University of Mississippi – 8.5

Missouri: Washington University in St. Louis – 9.36

Montana: University of Montana – 8.7

Nebraska: Hastings College – 8.35

Nevada: Sierra Nevada College – 8.45

New Hampshire: University of New Hampshire – 8.8

New Jersey: Richard Stockton College of New Jersey – 8.71

New Mexico: University of New Mexico – 7.94

New York: Ithaca College – 9.42

North Carolina: Elon University – 9.41

North Dakota: University of North Dakota – 8.15

Ohio: Oberlin College – 9.31

Oklahoma: Oklahoma State University – 8.76

Oregon: University of Oregon – 9.67

Pennsylvania: Allegheny College – 9.19

Rhode Island: Brown University – 8.81

South Carolina: Furman University – 9.13

South Dakota: South Dakota School of Mines and Technology – 8.32

Tennessee: Vanderbilt University – 8.91

Texas: University of North Texas – 9.52

Utah: Westminster College – 9.14

Vermont: University of Vermont – 9.41

Virginia: James Madison University – 8.84

Washington: University of Washington – 9.46

West Virginia: West Virginia University – 8.02

Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point – 9.13

Wyoming: University of Wyoming – 8.38

You Might Also Like

Which States Made The Top 10 For LEED-Certified Green Buildings?

Barriers to Fossil Fuel Divestment at Tufts University

Two Washington DC Universities Combine For Country’s Largest Non-Utility Solar Energy Purchase

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday. JustTulsa / CC BY 2.0

Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday.

Read More Show Less
The Firefly Watch project is among the options for aspiring citizen scientists to join. Mike Lewinski / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 2.0

By Tiffany Means

Summer and fall are great seasons to enjoy the outdoors. But if you're already spending extra time outside because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be out of ideas on how to make fresh-air activities feel special. Here are a few suggestions to keep both adults and children entertained and educated in the months ahead, many of which can be done from the comfort of one's home or backyard.

Read More Show Less
People sit at the bar of a restaurant in Austin, Texas, on June 26, 2020. Texas Governor Greg Abbott ordered bars to be closed by noon on June 26 and for restaurants to be reduced to 50% occupancy. Coronavirus cases in Texas spiked after being one of the first states to begin reopening. SERGIO FLORES / AFP via Getty Images

The coronavirus may linger in the air in crowded indoor spaces, spreading from one person to the next, the World Health Organization acknowledged on Thursday, as The New York Times reported. The announcement came just days after 239 scientists wrote a letter urging the WHO to consider that the novel coronavirus is lingering in indoor spaces and infecting people, as EcoWatch reported.

Read More Show Less
A never-before-documented frog species has been discovered in the Peruvian highlands and named Phrynopus remotum. Germán Chávez

By Angela Nicoletti

The eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains in central Perú are among the most remote places in the world.

Read More Show Less
Left: Lemurs in Madagascar on March 30, 2017. Mathias Appel / Flickr. Right: A North Atlantic right whale mother and calf. National Marine Fisheries Service

A new analysis by scientists at the Swiss-based International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) found that lemurs and the North Atlantic right whale are on the brink of extinction.

Read More Show Less
Nobody knows exactly how much vitamin D a person actually needs. However, vitamin D is becoming increasingly popular. Colin Dunn / Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Julia Vergin

It is undisputed that vitamin D plays a role everywhere in the body and performs important functions. A severe vitamin D deficiency, which can occur at a level of 12 nanograms per milliliter of blood or less, leads to severe and painful bone deformations known as rickets in infants and young children and osteomalacia in adults. Unfortunately, this is where the scientific consensus ends.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Data from a scientist measuring macroalgal communities in rocky shores in the Argentinean Patagonia would be added to the new system. Patricia Miloslavich / University of Delaware

Ocean scientists have been busy creating a global network to understand and measure changes in ocean life. The system will aggregate data from the oceans, climate and human activity to better inform sustainable marine management practices.

EcoWatch sat down with some of the scientists spearheading the collaboration to learn more.

Read More Show Less