Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Viral Video Shows the Insanity of Bottled Water

Food
Viral Video Shows the Insanity of Bottled Water

In a bid to increase awareness of the health, environmental and monetary benefits of tap water, Yarra Valley Water launched Be Smart. Choose Tap. To continue in its efforts, the Australian-based utility released a satirical video last October showing why tap is the logical solution over bottled water

The video went viral this week after it was posted on Upworthy, so we thought it worthy of sharing too.

“Sometimes in Australia we take our quality tap water for granted, we forget that more than a billion people worldwide do not have access to safe drinking water,” said Goulburn Valley Water Managing Director Peter Quinn, whose company recently joined the water initiative. 

According to Hydrate Life, here are some of the most significant ways bottled water impacts the U.S.:

  • Bottled Water Uses a lot of Oil: Seventeen million barrels of oil are used in the production of plastic water bottles annually in the U.S., which is equivalent to fueling 1 million cars for a year. When considering all that goes into getting bottled water to stores and markets, this number can jump as high as 54 million barrels.

  • Bottled Water Creates Tons of Waste: Only one out of five plastic water bottles are recycled, contributing to the 3 billion pounds (or about 1.5 million tons) of plastic bottle waste each year. As a comparison, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, CA weighs 887,000 tons. Further, PET 1 bottles cannot be cleaned properly and over time can leech plastic components into the water, so it is not recommended that they be reused. PET bottles are highly resistant to biodegradation, and if they’re incinerated, they release toxic fumes.

Visit EcoWatch’s FOOD and GMO pages for more related news on this topic. 

A North Atlantic right whale feeds off the shores of Duxbury Beach, Massachusetts in 2015. David L. Ryan / The Boston Globe via Getty Images

The population of extremely endangered North Atlantic right whales has fallen even further in the last year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said Monday.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Hundreds of Canadian children took part in a massive protest march against climate change in Toronto, Canada, on May 24, 2019. Creative Touch Imaging Ltd. / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Heather Houser

Compost. Fly less. Reduce your meat consumption. Say no to plastic. These imperatives are familiar ones in the repertoire of individual actions to reduce a person's environmental impact. Don't have kids, or maybe just one. This climate action appears less frequently in that repertoire, but it's gaining currency as climate catastrophes mount. One study has shown that the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from having one fewer child in the United States is 20 times higher—yes 2000% greater—than the impact of lifestyle changes like those listed above.

Read More Show Less

Trending

For the first time on record, the main nursery of Arctic sea ice in Siberia has yet to start freezing by late October. Euronews / YouTube

By Sharon Guynup

At this time of year, in Russia's far north Laptev Sea, the sun hovers near the horizon during the day, generating little warmth, as the region heads towards months of polar night. By late September or early October, the sea's shallow waters should be a vast, frozen expanse.

Read More Show Less
Fossil remains indicate these birds had a wingspan of over 20 feet. Brian Choo, CC BY-NC-SA

By Peter A. Kloess

Picture Antarctica today and what comes to mind? Large ice floes bobbing in the Southern Ocean? Maybe a remote outpost populated with scientists from around the world? Or perhaps colonies of penguins puttering amid vast open tracts of snow?

Read More Show Less
A baby orangutan displaced by palm oil plantation logging is seen at Nyaru Menteng Rehabilitation Center in Borneo, Indonesia on May 27, 2017. Jonathan Perugia / In Pictures / Getty Images

The world's largest financial institutions loaned more than $2.6 trillion in 2019 to sectors driving the climate crisis and wildlife destruction, according to a new report from advocacy organization portfolio.earth.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch