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EcoWatch Launches TrumpWatch

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EcoWatch Launches TrumpWatch

With nearly two weeks since the presidential election, the shock has worn off and reality has set in. Donald Trump will take office at Noon of Jan. 20, 2017, and become the 45th president of the United States.

Once in office, Trump will have the dubious distinction as the only national leader in the world to reject the scientific consensus that humans are driving climate change.

Though Trump could choose to invest in the clean energy economy and support strong climate action, every indication—from his campaign to his cabinet picks—shows that his plans will be devastating to our planet. From wanting to "cancel" the U.S. participation in the Paris climate agreement to dismantling the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Trump shows no signs of pivoting.

For the next two months as Trump prepares for the White House and through his first 100 days in office, EcoWatch will track the president-elect's actions on the environment and be a central communication hub for the environmental movement, politicians, companies and individuals working to keep the Trump administration in check.

EcoWatch's TrumpWatch will galvanize the movement working to ensure that environmental protections remain intact, and America remains a leader in reducing global carbon emissions and investing in renewable energy.

There has never been a more important time to be engaged on these issues to ensure the health and longevity of our planet.

Will you join us?

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