Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Teen Activist Walks Across America for Climate Action

Climate

Are you tired of hearing how apathetic young people are? Then listen to Kelsey Juliana.

Oregon teen Kelsey Juliana tells Bill Moyers how she got her passion to protect the climate. Photo credit: Moyers & Company

Her parents met in ’90s while protesting logging in Oregon's old-growth forests, and she's a chip off the old blocks. Now 18, she's a plaintiff in a lawsuit to force Oregon to act to reduce carbon emissions that are driving climate change.

She'll be in New York City for the People's Climate March but she's in the midst of a longer walk. She's joined other environmental activists in the Great March for Climate Action, which stepped off in Los Angeles on March 1 and winds up in Washington D.C. on Nov. 1. The group is taking a break just as they're crossing the Indiana border into Ohio and taking a bus to New York City to join the march.

Juliana talked to Bill Moyers on this week's edition of Moyers & Company to explain why she's so devoted to saving the planet.

“You don't have to call yourself an activist to act,” she says on the segment. “I think that's so important that people my age really get [that] into their heads. As a younger person, I have everything to gain from taking action and everything to lose from not. It's important that youth are the ones who are standing up because of the fact that we do have so much to lose. We don't need to only look at ecology. We can look at it as, 'Why do I care about climate change? Because I want to be able to do things. Because I want to ensure my children will be able to do things.'”

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

The People’s Climate March: A Time Where ‘We’ Can Make a Difference

Naomi Klein on Democracy Now! Discussing Capitalism vs. the Climate

Josh Fox: It’s Easy to Switch to Renewable Energy

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

In Germany's Hunsrück village of Schorbach, numerous photovoltaic systems are installed on house roofs, on Sept. 19, 2019. Thomas Frey / Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Germany's target for renewable energy sources to deliver 65% of its consumed electricity by 2030 seemed on track Wednesday, with 52% of electricity coming from renewables in 2020's first quarter. Renewable energy advocates, however, warned the trend is imperiled by slowdowns in building new wind and solar plants.

Read More Show Less

In many parts of the U.S., family farms are disappearing and being replaced by suburban sprawl.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
General view of the empty Alma bridge, in front of the Eiffel tower, while the city imposes emergency measures to combat the Coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak, on March 17, 2020 in Paris, France. Edward Berthelot / Getty Images

Half the world is on lockdown. So, the constant hum of cars, trucks, trains and heavy machinery has stopped, drastically reducing the intensity of the vibrations rippling through the Earth's crust. Seismologists, who use highly sensitive equipment, have noticed a difference in the hum caused by human activity, according to Fast Company.

Read More Show Less
The current rate of CO2 emissions is a major event in the recorded history of Earth. EPA

By Andrew Glikson

At several points in the history of our planet, increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have caused extreme global warming, prompting the majority of species on Earth to die out.

Read More Show Less
The "Earthrise" photograph that inspired the first Earth Day. NASA / Bill Anders

For EcoWatchers, April usually means one thing: Earth Day. But how do you celebrate the environment while staying home to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus?

Read More Show Less