Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Extreme Heat Wave in Quebec May Have Killed 70

Climate
Extreme Heat Wave in Quebec May Have Killed 70
Children play in the water fountains at the Place des Arts on a hot day in Montreal, July 3, 2018. EVA HAMBACH / AFP / Getty Images

The death toll in Quebec's heat wave last week may have reached as many as 70, officials said Tuesday, as temperatures exceeded 100 degrees F.


Thirty-four of those deaths were in Montreal, where temperatures soared 20 degrees above normal and CBC reports that the morgue became so overcrowded it had to partner with a local funeral home for extra storage.

Officials say most of the deaths were women and men over the age of 50 living alone in apartments with no air conditioning, and over 60 percent had an underlying medical condition. The increasing frequency and intensity of heat waves is among the most obvious and well-documented effects of climate change.

As reported by Canada's National Observer:

Bouts of extreme heat are expected to become more frequent, notes a 2018 report from Canada's federal and provincial auditors general, with their evaluation concluding that governments had under-delivered on commitments to deal with climate change.
The report states that "by 2100, the number of days above 30 degrees Celsius in Canadian cities is expected to double and a one-in-20-year hottest day may become a one-in-two-year event."

For a deeper dive:

CNN, NPR, CNBC, National Observer, Huffington Post

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

Sunrise over planet Earth. Elements of this image furnished by NASA. Elen11 / iStock / Getty Images Plus

On Thursday, April 22, the world will celebrate Earth Day, the largest non-religious holiday on the globe.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
NASA has teamed up with non-profit Carbon Mapper to help pinpoint greenhouse gas sources. aapsky / Getty Images

NASA is teaming up with an innovative non-profit to hunt for greenhouse gas super-emitters responsible for the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Trending
schnuddel / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Jenna McGuire

Commonly used herbicides across the U.S. contain highly toxic undisclosed "inert" ingredients that are lethal to bumblebees, according to a new study published Friday in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

Read More Show Less
A warming climate can lead to lake stratification, including toxic algal blooms. UpdogDesigns / Getty Images

By Ayesha Tandon

New research shows that lake "stratification periods" – a seasonal separation of water into layers – will last longer in a warmer climate.

Read More Show Less
A view of Lake Powell from Romana Mesa, Utah, on Sept. 8, 2018. DEA / S. AMANTINI / Contributor / Getty Images

By Robert Glennon

Interstate water disputes are as American as apple pie. States often think a neighboring state is using more than its fair share from a river, lake or aquifer that crosses borders.

Read More Show Less