Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Top Coal CEO to Trump: You Can't Bring Coal Jobs Back

Popular
Top Coal CEO to Trump: You Can't Bring Coal Jobs Back

Despite President Trump's promise last week at a Kentucky rally that "a lot of coal miners are going back to work" as a result of his executive order, most experts, analysts and even coal industry executives caution that the administration's moves to roll back the Clean Power Plan may do little to help bring back jobs.


Robert Murray, CEO of Murray Energy, the largest coal company in the country, told The Guardian Monday that Trump should "temper his expectations" with the executive order and that the president "can't bring [coal jobs] back." Bloomberg also pointed out that the executive order's order to lift the moratorium on federal coal leasing may see little demand from coal companies focused on using the reserves they have.

"It's not like companies will suddenly say, 'Oh great, we can lease on more federal land, let's do it and boost production,'" Rob Barnett, an analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence, said. Obama's "policy was all with an eye toward 2040 as opposed to 2018."

In the latest in coal plant retirements, a Kentucky plant announced plans for closure Monday, while a San Antonio utility confirmed that federal moves to roll back the Clean Power Plan did not change its plans to shutter one of its coal plants.

For a deeper dive:

Coal: New York Times, Bloomberg Murray CEO: The Guardian, The Hill

Coal leasing: Bloomberg Plant closures: AP, San Antonio Business Journal

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

A new species of bat has been identified in West Africa. MYOTIS NIMBAENSIS / BAT CONSERVATION INTERNATIONAL

In 2018, a team of researchers went to West Africa's Nimba Mountains in search of one critically endangered species of bat. Along the way, they ended up discovering another.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Lakota spiritual leader Chief Arvol Looking Horse attends a demonstration against the proposed Keystone XL pipeline from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico in front of the White House in Washington, DC, on January 28, 2015. Nicholas Kamm / AFP / Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden is planning to cancel the controversial Keystone XL pipeline on the first day of his administration, a document reported by CBC on Sunday suggests.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Seabirds often follow fishing vessels to find easy meals. Alexander Petrov / TASS via Getty Images

By Jim Palardy

As 2021 dawns, people, ecosystems, and wildlife worldwide are facing a panoply of environmental issues. In an effort to help experts and policymakers determine where they might focus research, a panel of 25 scientists and practitioners — including me — from around the globe held discussions in the fall to identify emerging issues that deserve increased attention.

Read More Show Less
A damaged home and flooding are seen in Creole, Louisiana, following Hurricane Laura's landfall on August 27, 2020. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By Elliott Negin

What a difference an election makes. Thanks to the Biden-Harris victory in November, the next administration is poised to make a 180-degree turn to again address the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
The new variant, known as B.1.1.7, spread quickly through southeastern England in December, causing case numbers to spike and triggering stricter lockdown measures. Hollie Adams / Getty Images

By Suresh Dhaniyala and Byron Erath

A fast-spreading variant of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 has been found in at least 10 states, and people are wondering: How do I protect myself now?

Read More Show Less