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Kumi Naidoo: The Global Climate Uprising

Climate

There are a lot of very hard working environmental activists in the world, but one person in particular that I think tops the list is Kumi Naidoo, executive director of Greenpeace International.

Naidoo joined Amy Goodman and Juan González on Democracy Now! two days after the UN Climate Summit and four days after the People's Climate March, where 400,000 people took to the streets of New York City demanding climate action.

"Well, my one-line description of the climate summit outcome is that we got much more than many of us thought we would get in terms of stated commitments, but we got significantly less than what the world needs us to do," Naidoo tells Goodman on the morning show. "I have no doubt in my mind that the mobilization of people in New York and around the world in such large numbers was a wake-up call both to the U.S. political establishment, as well as to the others, as well as the corporate sector.

"The important message to individual citizens around the world: We cannot rest on our own laurels now. Four hundred thousand here in New York. We need, globally, not just hundreds of millions; We need billions of people to actually join. And I think we have the basis to build that movement."

Watch as Naidoo shares more insights from this historic climate week in NYC and why the "Arctic affects us all."

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