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Join Omega Institute's 'Seeds of Change: Cultivating the Commons' Conference Oct. 9 - 11

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Join Omega Institute's 'Seeds of Change: Cultivating the Commons' Conference Oct. 9 - 11

Over the past decade, presenters and participants at the Omega Center for Sustainable Living's conferences have brought together a group of thinkers, activists and enthusiasts all working on the interconnected issues central to creating a more regenerative future. These conversations have begun creating a compelling and hopeful vision for a socially just, inclusive and sustainable society.

This year the conversation continues with Seeds of Change: Cultivating the Commons.

Viewing our environmental, economic and social challenges through the lens of the commons allows us to more easily see how their solutions are connected. As renowned eco-feminist Vandana Shiva says, the commons is more than just resources, the commons is the web of life."

The commons, Omega CEO Skip Backus says, helps instill an understanding and awareness of the value of both natural and cultural resources we all share."

This shift in awareness, Backus adds, is crucial in helping bring about the sort of cultural shift we need, a shift away from consumption and depletion and toward regeneration."

Vandana Shiva will be joined at Seeds of Change by orator and author Winona LaDuke; water advocate Maude Barlow; consumer activist and political commentator Ralph Nader; ecological visionary John Todd and grassroots seed freedom and food justice campaigners Will Allen, Natasha Bowens, Ken Greene and Jalal Sabur.

Whether you are already working closely with these issues or are interested in learning more, we invite you to be part of a growing community coming together to protect and care for the commons, including the pivotal right to save and share seeds, the necessity of stewarding our water resources, as well as transparency in labeling and access to healthy food.

Please join us Oct. 9 - 11, for this weekend of social action and personal reflection. For more information, visit: eOmega.org/seeds.

If you can't visit Omega's Rhinebeck, New York campus for the conference, the Sunday session of Seeds of Change: Cultivating the Commons will be live streamed, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ET, Oct. 11. Registration will allow you to view this session through Nov. 11.

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