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Jason Mraz: Stand With Farmers, Fight the Drought, Help Reverse Climate Change

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Jason Mraz: Stand With Farmers, Fight the Drought, Help Reverse Climate Change

Kiss The Ground, a Los Angeles-based non-profit, launched a campaign Monday urging people to support a petition asking California legislature to allocate $160 million from California’s Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund for regenerative agriculture, composting and other land management practices that help sequester carbon.

As part of the campaign, Kiss The Ground released a new short film, The Soil Storywhich features recording artist Jason Mraz. The campaign also has support from other celebrities, including Willie Nelson, Incubus and Moby.

“This is a pioneering solution for a drought-stricken state. Healthy soil is something that everyone can support,” says Finian Makepeace, co-founder and policy director of Kiss The Ground.

According to Kiss The Ground, building healthy soil will positively affect everyone. It’s a solution-driven approach to fighting drought, growing healthier food and ultimately helping to reverse climate change. The organization believes that since California is one of the biggest agriculture economies in the world, it should be the first U.S. state to fund healthy soil as a solution for climate change.

“If the end of summer legislative budget appropriations allocate these funds as currently proposed, California, one of the biggest agriculture economies in the world, will be the first U.S. state to fund healthy soil as a solution for climate change,” says Ray Archuleta, of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service.

The Soil Story is directed by Louis Fox, the director and writer of the viral video The Story of Stuff.

“Agriculture that focuses on restoring the soil protects our farms, food and future,” shares Ryland Engelhart, co-founder of Kiss The Ground and owner of Cafe Gratitude, the organic restaurant in San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego. “This is one of the most hopeful environmental solutions of our time.”

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