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Gucci Pledges to Go Fur-Free

Animals
Gucci Pledges to Go Fur-Free
Gucci fur loafers. REX Shutterstock

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and LAV, along with the Fur Free Alliance (FFA), are pleased that the leading global fashion house Gucci has announced it will no longer use animal fur, beginning with its spring summer 2018 collection. Gucci's President and CEO Marco Bizzarri announced the fur-free policy on Oct. 11 during the 2017 Kering Talk at The London College of Fashion.

Gucci's commitment follows a long-standing relationship with the HSUS and LAV—members of the international Fur Free Alliance, a coalition of more than 40 animal protection organizations working together to end the fur trade.


Gucci's fur-free policy includes mink, coyote, raccoon dog, fox, rabbit and karakul (otherwise known as Swakara, Persian lamb or astrakhan) and all others species specially bred or caught for fur.

The HSUS and LAV will continue to support Gucci in identifying and reducing its impact on animals and the environment.

"Gucci's decision is a game-changing moment in the fashion industry," PJ Smith, senior manager of fashion policy for the HSUS, said. "We'll look back at this moment, I predict, and see that this was the turning point when the business world turned away from fur and substituted cruelty-free garments in its place."

The company joins many other leading fashion brands and retailers in going fur-free—including Armani, HUGO BOSS, Yoox Net-a-Porter, Stella McCartney and more—and will be part of the international Fur Free Retailer Program.

"Being socially responsible is one of Gucci's core values, and we will continue to strive to do better for the environment and animals," Marco Bizzarri, Gucci's president and CEO, said. "With the help of HSUS and LAV, Gucci is excited to take this next step and hopes it will help inspire innovation and raise awareness, changing the luxury fashion industry for the better."

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