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Greenland's Ice Melt Breaks Record, Starting Nearly Two Months Early

Climate
Greenland's Ice Melt Breaks Record, Starting Nearly Two Months Early

Greenland’s melt season kicked off a month and a half early this year, scientists at the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) reported.

Gyldenlove Glacier, Greenland. Photo credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Greenland’s melt season typically runs from June until September, but almost 12 percent of Greenland’s ice sheet was melting as of Monday, which scientists say is unprecedented.

“We had to check that our models were still working properly,” said Peter Langen, a climate scientist at DMI. 

Maps show the current melt area centered around southwest Greenland. The graph shows the current melt season in blue and the average in black. Photo credit: Polar Portal

Areas of Greenland recorded temperatures this month that would have been unusually warm even in July and scientists expect more temperature records to be broken before the season is over.

For a deeper dive: Climate Home, Climate Central

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