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Inspiring Interview Urges You to Cut Plastic Consumption

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In a recent expedition, Gaelin Rosenwaks found plastic in the Great Blue Hole in Belize. Lomingen / iStock / Getty Images Plus

2018 was the year for plastic pollution awareness. One good aspect of the plastic crisis is the fact that we can solve it. Getting involved with solutions is an easy way to have our voices heard globally.


"The bottom line with plastic pollution is that there's plastic everywhere," said Gaelin Rosenwaks, founder of Global Ocean Exploration, during an EcoWatch Live interview on Facebook Thursday. The interactive live interview with Rosenwaks—who just got back from an expedition diving deep into the Great Blue Hole in Belize—inspired EcoWatchers to educate themselves on plastic pollution and commit to solutions.

"It doesn't matter where you go ... whether you are in the open sea ... or at the bottom of the blue hole, you're going to see plastic," said Rosenwaks who brings cutting-edge research from global expeditions to the public through film and photography.

Education is the first step. We must understand and acquire the tools we need to solve this pervasive issue. Eliminating single use-plastic when possible is critically important, but to double that effort, we must survey how many items we use that are wrapped in plastic and work towards a zero-waste lifestyle.

Each time we refuse plastic whether it's single use or plastic packaging, we are planting a seed for witnesses or companies to examine.

"The thing about plastic that's a blessing in disguise is that it's something that every single individual can do and have an impact," said Rosenwaks. "Showing that as a consumer you care will hopefully drive industries to care and make changes."

Tune in to the live conversation above to find out more about solutions to plastic pollution and to hear from two passionate individuals who are not only tackling the problem of plastic pollution, but creating a better world for future generations through awareness and commitment.

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