Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Gas Company Seeks Exemption from Endangered Species Act

Fracking

Earthjustice

The country is in the midst of an unprecedented oil and gas rush—brought on by a toxic and controversial technology known as hydraulic fracturing or "fracking."

And if polluting our air and water weren’t enough, now the oil and gas industry looks willing to run right over any animals that get in the way of their latest pipeline expansion plans.

NiSource, a big gas pipeline company, is pressuring the U.S Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) to issue a permit that would allow NiSource to hurt and kill endangered species anywhere along a mile-wide, 15,000-mile-long pipeline corridor. And to top it off, NiSource wants the permit to last fifty years.

We’ve seen a lot of oil and gas industry over-reaching in recent years. But the scope of this latest demand is, quite simply, shocking.

This nearly 10-million acre swath of land, covering 14 states from Louisiana to New York, is home to the Eastern bog turtle, the Louisiana black bear, and the Virginia flying squirrel and more than 70 other threatened and endangered species.

The oil and gas industry has already written itself loopholes into the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act and many other laws. Now they’re gunning for the Endangered Species Act. The beleaguered officials at FWS just might cave into industry’s latest demand—unless they hear from you.

FWS is giving members of the public until Dec. 13 to weigh in with their concerns.

Tell the FWS that NiSource’s request is too big and puts too many endangered animals at risk for too many years to be approved.

For more information, click here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

General view of the empty Alma bridge, in front of the Eiffel tower, while the city imposes emergency measures to combat the Coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak, on March 17, 2020 in Paris, France. Edward Berthelot / Getty Images

Half the world is on lockdown. So, the constant hum of cars, trucks, trains and heavy machinery has stopped, drastically reducing the intensity of the vibrations rippling through the Earth's crust. Seismologists, who use highly sensitive equipment, have noticed a difference in the hum caused by human activity, according to Fast Company.

Read More Show Less
The current rate of CO2 emissions is a major event in the recorded history of Earth. EPA

By Andrew Glikson

At several points in the history of our planet, increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have caused extreme global warming, prompting the majority of species on Earth to die out.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The "Earthrise" photograph that inspired the first Earth Day. NASA / Bill Anders

For EcoWatchers, April usually means one thing: Earth Day. But how do you celebrate the environment while staying home to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus?

Read More Show Less
Animal rights activists try to save dogs at a free market ahead of the Yulin Dog Eating Festival in Yulin city, south China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region on June 21, 2014. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

The Chinese city of Shenzhen announced Thursday that it would ban the eating of dogs and cats in the wake of the coronavirus, which is believed to have stemmed from the wildlife trade, according to Reuters.

Read More Show Less
The Great Barrier Reef, where record-high sea temperatures in February caused its most widespread coral bleaching event. JAYNE JENKINS / CORAL REEF IMAGE BANK

Tropical coral reefs are at a critical tipping point, and we've pushed them there, scientists say. Climate change may now cause previously rare, devastating coral bleaching events to occur in tropical coral reefs around the globe on a 'near-annual' basis, reported The Guardian.

Read More Show Less