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Budweiser's Greenwashing

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Budweiser's Greenwashing
A screenshot from the Budweiser "Wind Never Felt Better" 2019 Super Bowl commercial. YouTube

Budweiser's parent company is continuing to associate with groups with anti-climate agendas and ties to dark money, despite several ads aired during Sunday night's Super Bowl that portray the beverage giant as environmentally friendly, The New Republic reports.

Three of eight commercials aired by Anheuser-Busch on Sunday had themes around renewable energy, water conservation and organic farming, including one spot that brags that Budweiser is "brewed with wind power for a better tomorrow."


Budweiser | Wind Never Felt Better | 2019 Super Bowl Commercial youtu.be

However, membership records and conference attendances show that Anheuser-Busch is still involved with both the Chamber of Commerce foundation and the American Legislative Exchange Council, two groups with notable anti-climate and denialist-influenced stances and members.

As reported by The New Republic:

"Anheuser-Busch frames its commitment to renewable energy and clean water as being for the good of the planet, not the company's bottom line. 'Climate change is the most pressing issue confronting our planet,' Anheuser-Busch CEO Carlos Brito said in 2017. "We at AB InBev are committed to doing our part." But if that's true, then the planet could use fewer virtue-signaling Super Bowl ads and more honesty about the political causes that Budweiser drinkers are unwittingly supporting."

For a deeper dive:

The New Republic

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