Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Budweiser's Greenwashing

Business
A screenshot from the Budweiser "Wind Never Felt Better" 2019 Super Bowl commercial. YouTube

Budweiser's parent company is continuing to associate with groups with anti-climate agendas and ties to dark money, despite several ads aired during Sunday night's Super Bowl that portray the beverage giant as environmentally friendly, The New Republic reports.

Three of eight commercials aired by Anheuser-Busch on Sunday had themes around renewable energy, water conservation and organic farming, including one spot that brags that Budweiser is "brewed with wind power for a better tomorrow."


Budweiser | Wind Never Felt Better | 2019 Super Bowl Commercial youtu.be

However, membership records and conference attendances show that Anheuser-Busch is still involved with both the Chamber of Commerce foundation and the American Legislative Exchange Council, two groups with notable anti-climate and denialist-influenced stances and members.

As reported by The New Republic:

"Anheuser-Busch frames its commitment to renewable energy and clean water as being for the good of the planet, not the company's bottom line. 'Climate change is the most pressing issue confronting our planet,' Anheuser-Busch CEO Carlos Brito said in 2017. "We at AB InBev are committed to doing our part." But if that's true, then the planet could use fewer virtue-signaling Super Bowl ads and more honesty about the political causes that Budweiser drinkers are unwittingly supporting."

For a deeper dive:

The New Republic

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Jörg Carstensen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Carey Gillam

Bayer AG is reneging on negotiated settlements with several U.S. law firms representing thousands of plaintiffs who claim exposure to Monsanto's Roundup herbicides caused them to develop non-Hodgkin lymphoma, sources involved in the litigation said on Friday.

Read More Show Less
Tom Werner / DigitalVision / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

With many schools now closed due to the current COVID-19 outbreak, you may be looking for activities to keep your children active, engaged, and entertained.

Although numerous activities can keep kids busy, cooking is one of the best choices, as it's both fun and educational.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
In Germany's Hunsrück village of Schorbach, numerous photovoltaic systems are installed on house roofs, on Sept. 19, 2019. Thomas Frey / Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Germany's target for renewable energy sources to deliver 65% of its consumed electricity by 2030 seemed on track Wednesday, with 52% of electricity coming from renewables in 2020's first quarter. Renewable energy advocates, however, warned the trend is imperiled by slowdowns in building new wind and solar plants.

Read More Show Less

In many parts of the U.S., family farms are disappearing and being replaced by suburban sprawl.

Read More Show Less
General view of the empty Alma bridge, in front of the Eiffel tower, while the city imposes emergency measures to combat the Coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak, on March 17, 2020 in Paris, France. Edward Berthelot / Getty Images

Half the world is on lockdown. So, the constant hum of cars, trucks, trains and heavy machinery has stopped, drastically reducing the intensity of the vibrations rippling through the Earth's crust. Seismologists, who use highly sensitive equipment, have noticed a difference in the hum caused by human activity, according to Fast Company.

Read More Show Less