Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Carbon Handout for Airlines: 'An Awful Deal for the Climate'

Business
Carbon Handout for Airlines: 'An Awful Deal for the Climate'
Los Angeles International Airport. Alan Wilson / CC BY 2.0

Airlines will be able to claim credit for "low-carbon" fossil fuels in an emissions-trading scheme meant to reduce the industry's carbon footprint, the UN's aviation agency decided Thursday.

The decision to credit fossil fuels, which campaigners say was raised late in the negotiations process, will allow airlines to claim reduced offsets from a broad definition of "green fuel," which counts "clean oil" and kerosene produced at a refinery running on renewable electricity.


Campaigners say the deal could also allow airlines to claim carbon offsets from older projects, and may result in offsets being double counted. The agreement "looks more and more like an awful deal for the climate," Andrew Murphy of Transport & Environment told Forbes. "The EU has tried long and hard to get a better agreement but in the end airlines, supported by Saudi Arabia and Trump's America, have got what they want. The attempt to greenwash oil is just the latest example of this."

The aviation sector, currently responsible for two percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, is on track to rise to a quarter of all emissions by 2050.

As reported by BusinessGreen:

Countries will return to the negotiating table in September to thrash out the final rules for how the offset scheme works. But it seems there is a real danger that by keeping everyone on board with the deal, the potential green benefits of a scheme that was meant to clear a new era of green aviation for take off may fail to take flight altogether.

For a deeper dive:

Climate Home, Forbes, BusinessGreen

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

A replica of a titanosaur. AIZAR RALDES / AFP via Getty Images

New fossils uncovered in Argentina may belong to one of the largest animals to have walked on Earth.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Trump's Affordable Clean Energy rule eliminated a provision mandating that utilities move away from coal. VisionsofAmerica /Joe Sohm / Getty Images

A federal court on Tuesday struck down the Trump administration's rollback of the Obama-era Clean Power Plan regulating greenhouse gas emissions from power plants.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A wild mink in Utah was the first wild animal in the U.S. found with COVID-19. Peter Trimming via Wikipedia, CC BY-SA

By Jonathan Runstadler and Kaitlin Sawatzki

Over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers have found coronavirus infections in pet cats and dogs and in multiple zoo animals, including big cats and gorillas. These infections have even happened when staff were using personal protective equipment.

Read More Show Less
A mass methane release could begin an irreversible path to full land-ice melt. NurPhoto / Contributor / Getty Images

By Peter Giger

The speed and scale of the response to COVID-19 by governments, businesses and individuals seems to provide hope that we can react to the climate change crisis in a similarly decisive manner - but history tells us that humans do not react to slow-moving and distant threats.

Read More Show Less
Doug Emhoff, U.S. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, Jill Biden and President-elect Joe Biden wave as they arrive on the East Front of the U.S. Capitol for the inauguration on Jan. 20, 2021 in Washington, DC. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By John R. Platt

The period of the 45th presidency will go down as dark days for the United States — not just for the violent insurgency and impeachment that capped off Donald Trump's four years in office, but for every regressive action that came before.

Read More Show Less