Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

5 Islands in the South Pacific 'Completely Lost to Rising Seas'

Climate
5 Islands in the South Pacific 'Completely Lost to Rising Seas'

Five vegetated reef islands in the Pacific’s Solomon Islands have disappeared because of coastal erosion and sea level rise, according to a study published in Environmental Research Letters that confirmed numerous anecdotal accounts of extreme shoreline changes.

Many homes are close to sea level on the Solomons. Photo credit: Simon Albert

At least six more islands are also experiencing severe erosion. The islands ranged from one to five hectares, supported dense tropical vegetation and two islands were home to fishing communities that had to be relocated.

All that remains of one of the completely eroded islands. Photo credit: Simon Albert

For a deeper dive: Washington PostIB TimesGizmodoIndependentABC AustraliaDeutsche WellsRTScroll

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Dead Zones Devour Oceans’ Oxygen

‘Apocalyptic’ Inferno Engulfs Canadian Tar Sands City

Arctic Ice Melt Affects Weather Patterns All Over North Atlantic

Climate Change Could Make Parts of Middle East and North Africa ‘Uninhabitable’

Fall is with us and winter is around the corner, so the season for colds and flu has begun — joining COVID-19. monstArrr / Getty Images

By Gudrun Heise

Just as scientists are scoring successes in coronavirus research, new problems are on their way. Fall is with us and winter is around the corner, so the season for colds and flu has begun — joining COVID-19.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Icebergs float at the mouth of the Ilulissat Icefjord during a week of unseasonably warm weather on Aug. 4, 2019 near Ilulissat, Greenland. Sean Gallup /Getty Images

Rising temperatures in the air and the water surrounding Greenland are melting its massive ice sheet at a faster rate than anytime in the last 12 millennia, according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A grim new assessment of the world's flora and fungi has found that two-fifths of its species are at risk of extinction as humans encroach on the natural world, as The Guardian reported. That puts the number of species at risk near 140,000.

Read More Show Less
Flowers like bladderwort have changed their UV pigment levels in response to the climate crisis. Jean and Fred / CC BY 2.0

As human activity transforms the atmosphere, flowers are changing their colors.

Read More Show Less
A factory in Newark, N.J. emits smoke in the shadow of NYC on January 18, 2018. Kena Betancur / VIEWpress / Corbis / Getty Images

By Sharon Zhang

Back in March, when the pandemic had just planted its roots in the U.S., President Donald Trump directed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to do something devastating: The agency was to indefinitely and cruelly suspend environmental rule enforcement. The EPA complied, and for just under half a year, it provided over 3,000 waivers that granted facilities clemency from state-level environmental rule compliance.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch