Quantcast
Climate

10 Food Company CEOs Tell World Leaders to Act on Climate

With key international climate negotiations fast approaching in Paris, the CEOs of Mars, Incorporated, General Mills, Unilever, Kellogg Company, Nestlé USA, New Belgium Brewing, Ben & Jerry’s, Clif Bar, Stonyfield Farm and Dannon USA released a joint letter yesterday to U.S. and world leaders pledging to accelerate business action on climate change and urging governments to do the same by forging a robust international agreement this December.

Coordinated by the nonprofit sustainability advocacy organization Ceres, the letter was spotlighted today at a bipartisan, bicameral briefing on climate change in Washington, DC featuring a half-dozen food company executives. The briefing was sponsored by Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) and Rep. Chris Gibson (R-NY).

“Climate change is bad for farmers and agriculture. Drought, flooding and hotter growing conditions threaten the world’s food supply and contribute to food insecurity,” states the letter, which will appear in today’s Washington Post and Financial Times. “As world leaders convene in Paris you will have an opportunity to take action on climate change that could significantly change our world for the better.”

“It’s extraordinary to see these iconic food companies, many of which are long-standing competitors, unite at this pivotal moment to urge our political leaders to act swiftly and decisively on global warming, which poses a direct threat to global food supplies,” said Mindy Lubber, president of Ceres.

CEO signatories pledged to boost their companies’ sustainability efforts, to advocate achievable, enforceable science-based carbon reduction targets and to share their best practices to encourage other companies to join their effort.

Mars President and CEO Grant Reid said, “As a society we face immense challenges, including climate change, water scarcity and deforestation. We cannot stand back and simply accept these things as they are. We’re calling on the business community and global leaders to work together to set a new way forward. We can and must, do more.”

“Climate change is a shared, global challenge that is best addressed at scale,” added Ken Powell, chairman and CEO of General Mills. “To reduce emission levels, we must work across our collective value chains with growers, suppliers, customers, peer companies, government leaders and industry partners. Together, we will identify new solutions and promote sustainable agriculture practices that drive emission reductions.”

Companies signing the letter are members of Ceres’ Business for Innovative Climate and Energy Policy (BICEP), an advocacy coalition of companies working with policymakers to pass meaningful energy and climate legislation. It is the first time these businesses have publicly united on the need for a strong global climate deal at the 21st Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, also known as “COP21.” Governments of more than 190 nations will meet in Paris this December at COP21 to discuss a possible new global agreement on climate change aimed at keeping global warming below the 2C threshold.

The most recent reports by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) show that climate change is already cutting into global food supplies and is contributing to price spikes and social unrest in various regions of the world. The rate of increase in crop yields is slowing, especially for wheat, which is sensitive to changes in heat. By 2030 negative impacts are expected across a wide spectrum of crops in both arid and non-arid regions. Changes in temperature and rainfall patterns could lead to food price rises of between 3 percent and 84 percent by 2050, according to the IPCC.

Read page 1

“The debate in Congress on climate change has been filled for too long with misinformation and partisan talking points,” said Sen. Whitehouse. “Today marks an important shift, as both Democrats and Republicans come together to listen to major food and beverage companies discuss how they are adapting to this global threat. I hope we will be able to build on today’s discussion and begin working toward bipartisan climate solutions in Congress.”

“Environmental stewardship through public-private cooperation is critical to the long term success of our nation as well as the stability and health of our global and regional environments,” said Congressman Chris Gibson (NY-19). “It is a privilege to join with business leaders from across the country and globe in this discussion to explore ways forward on this issue.”

Many of the companies have set ambitious targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and driving sustainable sourcing in their supply chains. Mars, Unilever and Nestlé, for example, have each pledged to achieve 100 percent renewable energy across their operations, through RE100, a global initiative to engage, support and showcase influential companies committed to using 100 percent renewable power that now involves more than 30 companies globally.

Additionally:

  • Mars has set numerical, science-based goals to steer its sustainability programs, including the effort to eliminate all fossil fuel use from its operations by 2040. The company is on track to achieve a 25 percent reduction in its carbon emissions by the end of 2015, in comparison to 2007. Mars recently invested in a 211-megawatt wind power farm in Texas that completely offsets all of the electricity used by its U.S. operations.
  • Launched in 2010, the Unilever Sustainable Living Plan aims to decouple the company's growth from environmental impact. Unilever has set a goal to halve the greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of its products across the lifecycle by 2020. Its approach focuses on five areas: (1) acting on climate change by eliminating deforestation, (2) innovating products that use less GHG-intensive materials and that help consumers save energy in use, (3) reducing emissions in manufacturing and pursuing energy efficiency in factories and offices, (4) reducing transport emissions in distribution operations and (5) moving to renewable energy and more sustainable forms of biofuels.
  • Nestlé has set targets to reduce direct greenhouse gas emissions per ton of product by 35 percent since 2005, by 2015.
  • General Mills recently announced a commitment to reduce absolute greenhouse gas emissions by 28 percent across its full value chain—from farm to fork to landfill—over the next 10 years. The commitment was calculated using science-based methodology to achieve a level of emission reductions that science suggests is necessary to sustain the health of the planet.
  • Kellogg Company’s comprehensive 2020 Sustainability goals include expanding use of low-carbon energy in its plants by 50 percent and reducing energy and GHG emissions in our plants by an additional 15 percent (per metric tonne of food produced) from 2015 performance.

“Kellogg Company understands that in order to meet the food needs of a growing world population, we must be proactive in addressing climate change,” said John Bryant, chairman and CEO of Kellogg Company. “That starts with our farmers, extends through our entire supply chain and includes collaborative efforts with our peers, such as this critical, joint call to action.”

“Global weather patterns affect crop yields, water availability and infrastructure integrity. These changes impact the business we do every day as well as the work of farmers, suppliers and distributors across our vast network of partners," said Paul Grimwood, chairman and CEO of Nestlé USA. "Nestlé intends to flourish for at least another 150 years and we believe tackling climate change is key to a healthy planet and healthy people.”

“The cruel irony of climate change is that people in the developing world, many of whom grow the ingredients we use in our products, are the least able to adapt to climate change and will pay the steepest price for a problem they had no part in creating,” said Ben and Jerry’s CEO Jostein Solheim. “Today’s statement signals that our industry is committed to working towards solutions that deliver a stable climate and ensure the future success of our businesses and the communities around the world that supply them.”

“Bold action on climate change is urgently needed and simply makes good business sense,” said Paul Polman CEO of Unilever. “We are deepening our efforts to create transformational change to eliminate deforestation and working to lower our greenhouse gas impact. Businesses have a responsibility to act but we can’t do it alone. Consistent and credible government policy signals are essential, which is why we are urging political leaders to take action.”

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

146 Countries Covering Almost 87% of Global Emissions Submit Climate Plans Ahead of Paris

Wales and Bulgaria Latest to Join Massive EU Wave of GMO Bans

Monsanto Sued by Farm Workers Claiming Roundup Caused Their Cancers

Watch Live Oct. 11: Vandana Shiva and Others Discuss GMOs and Food Justice

Show Comments ()
Sponsored
The turkey ranch in Sonora is where Diestel keeps its pasture-raised birds. Jeanne Cooper

Popular Diestel Turkey Sold at Whole Foods Tests Positive for FDA-Prohibited Drugs

Diestel Turkey, sold by Whole Foods and other retailers at premium prices, says on its website that its "animals are never given hormones, antibiotics or growth stimulants."

But Diestel Turkey samples tested by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) suggest otherwise, leading consumers to wonder: Can these companies be trusted?

Keep reading... Show less
Animals

Slaughter of 90,000 Wild Horses Could Proceed Despite 80% Objection From American Public

The American Wild Horse Campaign on Thursday harshly criticized Interior Sec. Ryan Zinke's appointment of Brian Steed, the former chief of staff for U.S. Rep. Chris Stewart (R-UT), as the acting director of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) as dangerous and out of step with the wishes of the vast majority of Americans.

"Rep. Stewart is leading the charge to slaughter America's wild horses and burros over the opposition of 80 percent of Americans," said Suzanne Roy, AWHC Executive Director. "Putting his deputy at the helm of the agency charged with protecting these national icons is like putting the wolf in charge of the chicken coop."

Keep reading... Show less
Renewable Energy

Bright Idea: This Lamp Harvests Its Own Energy From Plants

Now that's green energy. Dutch product designer Ermi van Oers and her team are working on the first atmospheric lamp powered by living plants.

The Living Light does not require an electric socket. It can harvest its own energy through the photosynthetic process of the encased plant, which means the potential of this off-grid light source could be "huge," as Van Oers told Dezeen.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate

Landmark Youth Climate Lawsuit Heads to Federal Appeals Court

There has been a significant development in the constitutional climate change lawsuit so far successfully prosecuted by 21 youth plaintiffs: The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has decided to hear oral argument over whether the Trump administration can evade trial currently set for Feb. 5, 2018. Oral arguments will be heard before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco on Dec. 11 and can be watched on a live stream beginning at 10 a.m. PST.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Climate
Martin Schulz / Flickr

Pope Francis: These 4 'Perverse Attitudes' Could Push Earth to Its Brink

Pope Francis issued a strong message to negotiators at the COP23 climate talks in Bonn, Germany on Thursday, warning them not to fall into "four perverse attitudes" regarding the future of the planet—"denial, indifference, resignation and trust in inadequate solutions."

Francis, who has long pressed for strong climate action and wrote his 2015 encyclical on the environment, renewed his "urgent call" for renewed dialogue "on how we are building the future of the planet."

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
The Greenpeace ship Esperanza sits near the Statoil contracted oil rig Transocean Spitsbergen. Greenpeacce

Groups Sue Norway Over Failure to Protect Environment for Future Generations

By David Leestma

Greenpeace and the Nature and Youth environmental group opened a lawsuit this week over Norway's failure to abide by its constitutional obligation to safeguard the environment for future generations.

The lawsuit, which focuses on local environmental damage and the contribution that oil extraction will make to climate change, challenges 10 licenses issued by the Norwegian government for exploration in the Barents Sea. Given to Statoil, Chevron and other oil companies, the licenses violate Norway's constitution and the Paris agreement, according to the plaintiffs. Government lawyers claim the case is a publicity stunt that risks valuable jobs.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Food
Lia Heifetz of Barnacle Foods hauls kelp for salsa. Bethany Sonsini Goodrich

A Plea for Kelp: These Farmers and Chefs Want to Make Seaweed the Next Superfood

By Sarah Bedolfe

Summer in southeast Alaska is kelp season for the cofounders of Barnacle Foods, Lia Heifetz and Matt Kern. Each week, the pair watches the tides and weather, waiting for the right moment to cruise out to the abundant kelp beds offshore. They lean over the side of the boat and pull up the fronds and stalks, one piece at a time. As soon as they get back to shore, they start processing the day's harvest into a local delicacy: kelp salsa.

Salsa and Alaskan algae might seem like odd bedfellows, but for Barnacle Foods, it's a calculated decision. The kelp's savory notes make the salsa's flavor "a little more explosive," according to Kern. And the pairing is also a practical one. "Salsa is such a familiar food item," Heifetz said. It's "a gateway to getting more people to eat seaweed."

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
Lorie Shaull / Flickr

Massive Pipeline Leak Shows Why Nebraska Should Reject Keystone XL

About 210,000 gallons (5,000 barrels) of oil leaked Thursday from TransCanada's Keystone oil pipeline near Amherst, South Dakota, drawing fierce outcry from pipeline opponents.

The leak, the largest spill to date in South Dakota, comes just days before Nebraska regulators decide on whether its controversial sister project—the Keystone XL (KXL) Pipeline—will go forward.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored

mail-copy

The best of EcoWatch, right in your inbox. Sign up for our email newsletter!