Quantcast

Viral Video: Fisherman Saves Turtle Entangled in Plastic Bag

Animals

A video of a Pakistan fisherman is going viral after saving a sea turtle entangled in a plastic bag in the Arabian Sea.

Rahim jumps into the water to help the struggling turtle. Photo credit: WWF, Facebook

Amir Rahim was on a tuna fishing boat about 180 nautical miles off the coast of Karachi, Pakistan, when he saw an olive ridley sea turtle trapped in a polypropylene woven bag, the Huffington Post reported. The turtle was struggling to swim with the bag dragging behind it.

Rahim jumped into the water fully clothed to help the turtle. He wasn't able to free the turtle while in the water so his crew mates helped him bring the turtle on board. They cut the bag off of the turtle and released it back into the water.

Rahim is a trained observer for the World Wide Fund for Nature—Pakistan. The Huffington Post reported he had "seen plenty of turtles entangle in floating fishing nets," but had never seen one trapped in a floating bag.

Rahim cuts the plastic bag off of the turtle. Photo credit: WWF, Facebook

“Fishermen and other seafarers need to be educated about the hazards of throwing plastic stuff into the sea as it may kill a marine animal," he told DAWN.com.

Every year, 8 million metric tons of plastic end up in the oceans, according to Coastal Care. Eighty percent of those plastics come from land-based sources. Sea turtles are highly vulnerable to pollution and plastics. They can die from getting entangled in plastic materials or even ingesting them.

Watch the rescue video here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE:

9 Super Cool Facts About Sea Turtles

Nepal's Extinct Bird Spotted After Disappearing for 178 Years

First Mammal Goes Extinct Due to Human-Caused Climate Change

Rewilding Our National Parks

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Climate Week NYC

On Monday, Sept. 23, the Climate Group will kick off its 11th annual Climate Week NYC, a chance for governments, non-profits, businesses, communities and individuals to share possible solutions to the climate crisis while world leaders gather in the city for the UN Climate Action Summit.

Read More Show Less

By Pam Radtke Russell in New Orleans

Local TV weather forecasters have become foot soldiers in the war against climate misinformation. Over the past decade, a growing number of meteorologists and weathercasters have begun addressing the climate crisis either as part of their weather forecasts, or in separate, independent news reports to help their viewers understand what is happening and why it is important.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

While airlines only serve bottled drinking water directly to customers, they use the plane's water for coffee and tea, and passengers can drink the tap water. Aitor Diago / Getty Images

You might want to think twice before washing your hands in an airplane bathroom.

Read More Show Less
Individual standing in Hurricane Harvey flooding and damage. Jill Carlson / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Allegra Kirkland, Jeremy Deaton, Molly Taft, Mina Lee and Josh Landis

Climate change is already here. It's not something that can simply be ignored by cable news or dismissed by sitting U.S. senators in a Twitter joke. Nor is it a fantastical scenario like The Day After Tomorrow or 2012 that starts with a single crack in the Arctic ice shelf or earthquake tearing through Los Angeles, and results, a few weeks or years later, in the end of life on Earth as we know it.

Read More Show Less
A pregnant woman works out in front of the skyline of London. SHansche / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Air pollution particles that a pregnant woman inhales have the potential to travel through the lungs and breach the fetal side of the placenta, indicating that unborn babies are exposed to black carbon from motor vehicles and fuel burning, according to a study published in the journal Nature Communications.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

Teen activist Greta Thunberg delivered a talking-to to members of Congress Tuesday during a meeting of the Senate Climate Change Task Force after politicians praised her and other youth activists for their efforts and asked their advice on how to fight climate change.

Read More Show Less
Ten feet of water flooded 20 percent of this Minot, North Dakota neighborhood in June 2011. DVIDSHUB / CC BY 2.0

By Jared Brey

When Hurricane Michael tore through the Florida panhandle last October, it killed at least 43 people, caused an estimated $25 billion in damage and destroyed thousands of homes.

Read More Show Less
A protestor holds up her hand covered with fake oil during a demonstration on the U.C. Berkeley campus in May 2010. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

The University of California system will dump all of its investments from fossil fuels, as the Associated Press reported. The university system controls over $84 billion between its pension fund and its endowment. However, the announcement about its investments is not aimed to please activists.

Read More Show Less