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16 Cruelty-Free, Vegan Hair Dye Brands to Check Out

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Kateryna Shcherban / EyeEm / Getty Images

There's just something sublimely satisfying about dyeing your hair a vibrant shade of red in the middle of a cold, gray winter or bright blonde at the height of summer.


Fortunately, there are many cruelty-free hair colors available today to help you achieve the perfect look. No matter whether you prefer an all-natural dye, a quick pick-up box from the drugstore, a semi-permanent color or a salon service, there is definitely something for everyone.

Try one of these cruelty-free, vegan hair dye brands:

1. Paul Mitchell

Free of animal tests since the company began in 1980, Paul Mitchell is a pioneer in the world of cruelty-free beauty. Find a salon that uses Paul Mitchell hair dye.

2. Aveda

This PETA Business Friend carries a large selection of hair-care products and hair color for professional use. Click here to find an Aveda salon near you.

3. Shea Moisture

You can find this company's products at Target stores, which carry 12 shades—huzzah!

4. Lime Crime

Lime Crime's semi-permanent hair color is adorably called Unicorn Hair, and comes in 13 magical shades.

5. Kevin Murphy

This company offers a hair color line for professional use. The hair dye formula uses extracts from Peruvian bark, baobab, bamboo and orange blossoms to moisturize hair as well as antioxidants from kakadu plums, orchids, lotus flowers and desert limes to help repair chemical damage naturally.

6. Tints of Nature

Free of ammonia and parabens, Tints of Nature's hair color is infused with plant-derived extracts and vitamins C and E.

7. Green Hare Mud

This company offers seven shades of vegan, nontoxic dye and a selection of aftercare products.

8. Primary Syn

This 100 percent vegan hair color line for professional use features semi-permanent and permanent color from a single tube.

9. Developlus

This vegan hair color brand offers various lines, including professional-grade traditional colors, washable fun colors, correctives to bad dye jobs and more.

10. Rusk

With a line of hair color called Deepshine Color, Rusk offers a wide selection of color and aftercare products.

11. Manic Panic

If you're looking for semi-permanent hair color without ammonia or peroxide, look no further. Manic Panic has wild and tame colors—whatever fits your mood.

12. Good Dye Young

This cruelty-free line of hair dye, developed by Hayley Williams of the band Paramore, features numerous shades of semi-permanent hair color and temporary hair makeup. Good Dye Young is now available online through Sephora and on the official Good Dye Young website.

13. Arctic Fox

This entirely vegan brand uses no drying alcohols, PPDs or harsh chemicals.


Henna

14. Lush Henna Hair Dyes

These henna colors are blended with essential oils and cocoa butter, so your hair will be conditioned and feeling fabulous after use.

15. Henna Color Lab

This company's organic vegan henna hair dyes bond with your hair (as opposed to chemically coating it), while Ayurvedic herbs condition the hair and scalp. The company also carries hair dye specific to beards!

16. Morroco Method Int'l

All of Morocco Method's henna hair dyes are sulfate- and gluten-free and use no synthetic chemicals.

For a full list of cruelty-free hair dye companies, see our cruelty-free database and choose your desired product type from the pull-down menu.

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