Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

The Unsung Superfood: 4 Reasons to Love Parsley

Health + Wellness
The Unsung Superfood: 4 Reasons to Love Parsley

By Michelle Schoffro Cook

While most people probably think of parsley as nothing more than a garnish served alongside their restaurant meals, this herb warrants greater inclusion in our diet and natural medicine cabinet. Not only is parsley packed with nutrients, it helps prevent diabetes, prevent and treat kidney stones and is a proven all-natural anti-cancer remedy. It's definitely time to rethink this humble and overlooked herb.

Not only is parsley packed with nutrients, it helps prevent diabetes, prevent and treat kidney stones and is a proven all-natural anti-cancer remedy.

Native to southern Europe, parsley has been in use for more than 2,000 years and is used all around the world. According to the Roman statesman Pliny, "not a salad or sauce should be presented without it."

While we tend to think of parsley primarily as food, our ancestors thought of it primarily as medicine. It was in this capacity that they used parsley to treat many conditions including: gallstones, arthritis, insect bites—even as an aphrodisiac and to curb drunkenness. When it came to alcohol consumption, ancient people believed that parsley could absorb the intoxicating fumes of wine so it could not cause drunkenness.

Here are a few reasons to love parsley along with some ways to incorporate more parsley into your diet:

Nutrition Boost: Parsley is high in many nutrients, including: vitamins A and C, as well as the minerals iron and sulfur, making the dietary addition of this versatile herb a simple and delicious way to boost the nutrition content of almost any meal or fresh juice.

Anti-Cancer Powerhouse: A new study in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture found that parsley has potent anti-cancer properties and works against cancer in four different ways: it acts as an antioxidant that destroys free radicals before they damage cells, protects DNA from damage that can lead to cancer or other diseases and inhibits the proliferation and migration of cancer cells in the body.

Diabetes Prevention: Exciting new research in the Journal of Nutrition found that eating foods high in a naturally-occurring nutrient known as myricetin can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 26 percent. Parsley is one of the best sources of myricetin, containing about 8.08 mg of the medicinal nutrient per 100 grams of parsley.

Kidney Stones: In a study published in Urology Journal, researchers found that ingesting parsley leaf and roots reduced the number of calcium oxalate deposits (found in kidney stones) in animals. Additionally, the researchers also found that ingesting parsley leaf and roots helped to break down kidney stones in animals suffering from the painful condition.

How to Use Parsley:

Parsley leaves and stems can be chopped and added to soups, stews, salads, pasta dishes, fresh juices and more. Try making the Middle Eastern favorite tabbouleh—a combination of couscous, parsley, chopped tomatoes, onions, lemon juice, olive oil and salt. You can substitute quinoa for a gluten-free, whole grain option. Parsley is also an excellent addition to most tomato sauces and chopped salads.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

The Many Health Benefits of Dragon Fruit

10 Ways to Stop Eating Late at Night

Sea Salt vs. Table Salt: Which Is Healthier?

Is Drinking Carbonated Water Healthy?

Marsh Creek in north-central California is the site of restoration project that will increase residents' access to their river. Amy Merrill

By Katy Neusteter

The Biden-Harris transition team identified COVID-19, economic recovery, racial equity and climate change as its top priorities. Rivers are the through-line linking all of them. The fact is, healthy rivers can no longer be separated into the "nice-to-have" column of environmental progress. Rivers and streams provide more than 60 percent of our drinking water — and a clear path toward public health, a strong economy, a more just society and greater resilience to the impacts of the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A Brood X cicada in 2004. Pmjacoby / CC BY-SA 3.0

Fifteen states are in for an unusually noisy spring.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A creative depiction of bigfoot in a forest. Nisian Hughes / Stone / Getty Images

Deep in the woods, a hairy, ape-like man is said to be living a quiet and secluded life. While some deny the creature's existence, others spend their lives trying to prove it.

Read More Show Less
President of the European Investment Bank Werner Hoyer holds a press conference in Brussels, Belgium on Jan. 30, 2020. Dursun Aydemir / Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

By Jon Queally

Noted author and 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben was among the first to celebrate word that the president of the European Investment Bank on Wednesday openly declared, "To put it mildly, gas is over" — an admission that squares with what climate experts and economists have been saying for years if not decades.

Read More Show Less

A dwarf giraffe is seen in Uganda, Africa. Dr. Michael Brown, GCF

Nine feet tall is gigantic by human standards, but when researcher and conservationist Michael Brown spotted a giraffe in Uganda's Murchison Falls National Park that measured nine feet, four inches, he was shocked.

Read More Show Less