sharks
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sharks

Green sea turtles are one of the marine animals that scientists have observed swimming in circles. Alexis Rosenfeld / Getty Images

Several large marine animals, from sharks to seals to turtles to penguins, have been observed doing something scientists find strange: swimming in circles.

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Scientists believe sharks use bioluminescence to camouflage themselves. Jérôme Mallefet

Scientists have newly photographed three species of shark that can glow in the dark, according to a study published in Frontiers in Marine Science last month.

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waterlust.com / @tulasendlesssummer_sierra .

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

The bright patterns and recognizable designs of Waterlust's activewear aren't just for show. In fact, they're meant to promote the conversation around sustainability and give back to the ocean science and conservation community.

Each design is paired with a research lab, nonprofit, or education organization that has high intellectual merit and the potential to move the needle in its respective field. For each product sold, Waterlust donates 10% of profits to these conservation partners.

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Whale sharks have unique spot patterns behind their gills that allow them to be individually identified using NASA pattern recognition technology. Tiffany Duong / Ocean Rebels

The oceans and space are two of the last frontiers of discovery. It is only fitting, then, that technology originally designed to help map stars imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope has now been adapted to match spot patterns on the world's largest fish, the whale shark, to help save it.

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A new study finds that a 2014 marine heat wave has pushed juvenile great white sharks further up the California coast. wildestanimal / Getty Images

The climate crisis is driving young great white sharks up the California coast, and it's causing problems for the endangered wildlife that live there.

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A Great White Shark off the coast of Guadalupe, Mexico. Arturo de Frias photography / Moment / Getty Images

An alarming new study reports that the global population of sharks and rays has declined 71 percent since 1970. The crash, due to overfishing, underscores the need for international policymakers to reverse the species' impending collapse.

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An epaulette shark (Hemiscyllium ocellatum) on a reef in the South Pacific. Auscape / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The future may be too hot for baby sharks, a study published Tuesday found.

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An illustration depicts a megalodon shark swimming after a pod of striped dolphins. Corey Ford / Stocktrek Images

The megalodon, or megatooth shark, was such a fearsome prehistoric predator that it continues to inspire horror films roughly 3.6 million years after its extinction.

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The island of Tristan da Cunha. VictoriaJStokes / iStock / Getty Images Plus

In the South Atlantic Ocean, a tiny island of 250 people has made a significant contribution to global marine conservation by protecting a huge swath of ocean under its control.

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A woman swims at night with a shark in the Indian Ocean, Maldives on March 23, 2017. Andrey Nekrasov / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Scientists are racing to create a cure for COVID-19, but the toll on sharks might be irreparable. Conservationists estimate that half a million of the predators may be killed to supply the world with a coronavirus vaccine when one is developed.

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Sharks, unlike other large fish, have skeletons made out of cartilage. Ryan Espanto / CC BY 2.0

A recent fossil discovery could overturn the way scientists think about shark evolution.

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Shark Week may be over for the summer, but the marine predators patrol the world's oceans all year long.

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Papua New Guinea. Photo: Ambroise Brenier/WCS

By Jonathan Booth

"We saw two swimming past our canoe the other day as we came to shore!"

"Yes, we saw one over towards the mangroves not so long ago…"

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