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Squatty Potty Makes Me Feel Happy and Healthy

Health + Wellness

About a month ago, I blogged about the Squatty Potty. I came across it online, and it looked like a good idea. I wondered if I could DIY something similar. Much to my delight, the creator of the Squatty Potty saw my blog post, and offered to send me a sample unit to test.

I spoke with a gastroenterologist at a major medical center in Manhattan, who confirmed that Squatty Potty claims about squatting are true. She told me that she recommends eliminating in a squatting position to all of her patients who have pelvic floor problems. Photo credit: Squatty Potty

The model that I tested is the 9-inch-tall Squatty Tao Bamboo. They also make plastic and MDF versions. I chose the bamboo version because it is so very aesthetically pleasing. To me, it looks like one of those fancy meditation stools that you see at retreat centers.

It is very hard to discuss the Squatty Potty without talking about bathroom functions. I am attempting to write this without using the word "poop." Oops, I just said it. Fine. I give up. The Squatty Potty is a stool designed to help you to poop. The human body was designed to eliminate (you like that? I didn't say "poop") in a squatting position. This video explains everything:

I realize that the video is a promotional video produced by the Squatty Potty people, but I actually spoke with a gastroenterologist at a major medical center in Manhattan, who confirmed that their claims about squatting are true. She told me that she recommends eliminating in a squatting position to all of her patients who have pelvic floor problems. The doctor also went on to say that "ineffective pushing" actually lands a good number of patients in surgery for anal fissures.

If only everyone had a Squatty Potty.

The owners of the company are really nice people, and the Squatty Potty is made in Utah, which is in America. And buying products that are made in the U.S.A. feels almost as good as using the Squatty Potty. Photo credit: Squatty Potty

I am not saying that because the Squatty Potty people were kind enough to send me a shiny new unit to keep. I am saying that because I have been using the Squatty Potty for three weeks now, and I feel incredibly healthy. I have had a host of digestion problems for years, and in addition to eating a high-fiber natural diet and seeing the aforementioned gastroenterologist, I feel like the Squatty Potty completes my treatment plan.

Also, I never feel bloated anymore. Literally: Never. Feel. Bloated. I might not actually be skinny, but I feel skinny. Simply eliminating with the help of the Squatty Potty gives you that "I just went on a 10 day juice cleanse" feeling. That is as close to publicly discussing my actual experience of pooping that I'll get. Trust me—try it; you'll like it.

As a home improvement website editor, I see sooooo many furniture items. After a while, they all blend into a big puddle of Stuff You Don't Need to Buy. However, the Squatty Potty is different. My experience using it has been so good that I literally think that every single bathroom should have one in it. Also, the owners of the company are really nice people, and the Squatty Potty is made in Utah, which is in America. And buying products that are made in the U.S.A. feels almost as good as using the Squatty Potty.

Chaya Goodman Kurtz originally wrote this story for Networx.com. It is reprinted with permission here.

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