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California Launching Its ‘Own Damn Satellite’

California's Gov. Jerry Brown speaks at a news conference held at the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco on Thursday, Sept. 13. Anda Chu / Digital First Media / The Mercury News / Getty Images

In a rebuke to the Trump administration, California will launch its "own damn satellite" to monitor pollution, Gov. Jerry Brown announced last week on the last day of the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco.


Brown's announcement caps several days of momentum towards progressing action on climate from the leaders gathered in California. Over the course of the summit, there were more than 500 announcements from thousands of subnational leaders, mobilizing billions of dollars in new commitments to fight climate change.

"It's time to take this momentum back home," Brown said in a later statement at the Summit's close. "Climate change waits for nobody. Let's get to work."

For a deeper dive:

News: Wall Street Journal, Politico, Thomson Reuters Foundation, NPR, Quartz, Gizmodo, San Francisco Chronicle, LA Times, Huffington Post, Fox News

Commentary: New York Times, Brad Plumer analysis, Washington Post, Joshua Busby and Johannes Urpelainen analysis, The Hill, Tracy Stein op-ed

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

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