Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Hilarious Video Tells the Real Story Behind the Chicken You Eat

Food
Hilarious Video Tells the Real Story Behind the Chicken You Eat

Today, Food & Water Watch in conjunction with Appeal To Reason Productions released a humorous new video revealing the myriad health and environmental issues with factory farmed chicken—the industrialized model under which most chicken served in the U.S. is produced.

“Consumers may think they are making a good choice by choosing ‘the white meat’ when eating out or shopping at the supermarket, but almost all chicken is produced and processed under conditions that are really appalling, making it unfit to eat,” said Wenonah Hauter, executive director of Food & Water Watch. “Now, in an outrageous move to increase profits, the industry is pushing to legalize slaughter line speeds of 175 birds per minute.”

The video, loosely inspired by Portlandia’s “Is it Local?” skit, features actors and Environmental Media Association board members Constance Zimmer, Raphael Sbarge and Samantha Ressler.

“We’re excited to support this educational effort,” said Constance Zimmer. “Factory farming is detrimental to the environment, and people probably don’t realize that most chicken in restaurants and supermarkets is produced this way. I sure didn't.”

The video depicts Zimmer and Sbarge as a couple dining in a nice restaurant, with Ressler, the waitress, informing them about how the chicken was produced and processed. In a hilarious exchange, the diners happily order the chicken that the waitress says was likely raised in a factory farm, fed antibiotics, dunked in bleach to remove fecal matter and barely inspected. Then the narrator asks, “Would you really eat chicken if you knew the facts?”

Food & Water Watch is using the video to bring attention to the myriad issues with chicken production and processing in the U.S., including a new rule the USDA is expected to implement soon that would deregulate poultry inspections, basically replacing trained government inspectors with untrained company employees and moving line speeds from 140 birds per minute to 175 birds per minute.

“With all the food safety issues created by factory farms and our consolidated food system, we can’t allow the USDA to deregulate meat inspections, no matter how hard the industry lobbies for it,” said Hauter. “We must make sure the federal government agencies in charge of food safety uphold the public interest, not private profits.”

Visit EcoWatch’s FOOD page for more related news on this topic.

A late snowfall could set back the growth of this budding lilac. oddharmonic / Flickr, CC BY-SA

By Richard B. Primack

Weather patterns across the U.S. have felt like a roller coaster ride for the past several months. December and January were significantly warmer than average in many locations, followed by February's intense cold wave and a dramatic warmup.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A majority of America's dams require billions of dollars in upgrades for them to handle heavier precipitation. skibreck / Getty Images

By Jeff Masters

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) gave America's infrastructure a C- grade in its quadrennial assessment issued March 3. ASCE gave the nation's flood control infrastructure – dams and levees – a D grade. This is a highly concerning assessment, given that climate change is increasingly stressing dams and levees as increased evaporation from the oceans drives heavier precipitation events.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Alex Wong / Getty Images

By Jacob Carter

On Wednesday, the Department of the Interior (DOI) announced that it will be rescinding secretarial order 3369, which sidelined scientific research and its use in the agency's decisions. Put in place by the previous administration, the secretarial order restricted decisionmakers at the DOI from using scientific studies that did not make all data publicly available.

Read More Show Less
Producing avocado and almond crops is having a detrimental effect on bees. Molly Aaker / Getty Images

At first glance, you wouldn't think avocados and almonds could harm bees; but a closer look at how these popular crops are produced reveals their potentially detrimental effect on pollinators.

Read More Show Less
An electric vehicle is plugged in to an EV charging station at a Walmart parking lot in Duarte, California on Sept. 14, 2018. FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP via Getty Images

Six major U.S. electricity utilities will collaborate to build a massive EV charging network across 16 states, they announced Tuesday.

Read More Show Less