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Submit Your Photo to EcoWatch's 'Best of Summer' Photo Contest

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Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!


Summer is a time when our EcoWatchers are outdoors more, enjoying nature. We love all the beautiful things the planet has to offer. Many special moments have us pulling out our camera to capture those occasions in awe of our environment. But don't keep those great images to yourself! We want you to share your best summer snapshot with us, and our readers. Whether it's a vacation photo, a day at the beach or the beauty of your backyard, snap a pic and submit your image to our contest.

The "Best of Summer" photo will be chosen by our judges to win a $250 Patagonia eGift card. We will also be awarding an "EcoWatchers' Choice" prize of a $100 Patagonia eGift card for the photo most loved by our readers. We will allow readers like you to vote monthly to decide on the best July submission, the best August submission, and finally vote between the two to decide the winner of the "EcoWatchers' Choice" prize!

So enjoy your summer, take in the beauty of your surroundings and show us what you see!

Submit your photo to bautista@ecowatch.com with the subject line "ECOWATCH SUMMER PHOTO CONTEST" by September 11th for a chance to win and to have your photo appear on EcoWatch.com. To be considered, submit your photo with the following information:

  1. Name
  2. Email
  3. Phone Number
  4. Photo Submission (.jpeg file format recommended)
  5. Caption
  6. Facebook and Instagram profiles (if available)

Our judges will choose the winning photo and the winner will be announced September 23rd. The EcoWatchers' Choice award winner will also be announced September 23rd.

Contest Judges

Gary and Sam Bencheghib

Brothers Gary and Sam Bencheghib are environmental activists and filmmakers. They founded Make a Change World, a media outlet that uncovers uplifting and inspirational stories on a mission to do good. They are passionate about creating social change through videos and giving a voice to the underrepresented. Together they have launched a series of expeditions from kayaking the world's dirtiest river on plastic bottles to stand-up paddling down New York's most toxic waterways. In the past three years, their work has been seen by more than 600 million people. This summer, while Gary bamboo bikes the Indonesian archipelago, Sam is set to become the first person to run across the American continent with recycled plastic shoes.

Anthony Bucci

Anthony Bucci is a wildlife photographer who grew up in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. He has donated numerous prints and other products to various wildlife societies across Canada, silent auctions and other fundraisers to raise funds for wildlife conservation and well-being. Anthony is currently on the raptor pick up list for O.W.L Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Delta BC, Canada. He feels it's important to give back to the wildlife conservation efforts and helping where Anthony can is a task he takes seriously. To Anthony, his wildlife photography is more than just taking pictures. Thinking about conservation and the well-being of all wildlife is always on his mind.

Amos Nachoum

Amos has led great expeditions for individual adventurers and institutions like Apple, IBM, Microsoft, Discovery Channel, Armani, Disney and Columbia Pictures. For National Geographic, he was team leader for separate photo expeditions to document the Red Sea, great white sharks and killer whales. His photos and essays have appeared in hundreds of publications around the globe, including National Geographic, Time, Life, The New York Times, Condé Nast Traveler, Le Figaro, Terra Sauvage, Airone, Mondo Somerso, Der Spiegel, Unterwasser and many more. His work has also been included in the books The Living Ocean, The World of Nature, and Oceans. He has appeared on National Geographic Explorer, Today, and Good Morning America and featured in People, Esquire and Money magazines. Amos's photography has won Nikon, Communication Arts, and BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year awards.

Margarita Samsonova

Margarita is a zoologist, sustainability activist, travel enthusiast and social media Influencer who uses the power of her social media to influence people to make more sustainable choices when traveling. After visiting more than 60 countries and seeing what actually happens to our planet, such as how plastic and food waste affects the environment, she decided to take a stand to speak about it and encourage people to care a little bit more about nature. Sustainability is the main focus of Margarita's social posts, and she speaks a lot about eco lifestyle, responsible traveling, ethical wildlife encounters, supporting locals and living in unity with nature.

Contest Details

By entering this photo contest, you are granting EcoWatch the right to use your photo on our site and our media channels in conjunction with this contest without the written permission. Unless otherwise instructed, EcoWatch reserves the right to use photo submissions on our site and in our media channels aside from the contest. If you do not wish to give EcoWatch the rights to use your photo aside from the current photo contest that you are participating in, please let us know within your email submission with the text, "No, I do not want to give EcoWatch the rights to use my photos in other media aside from the current photo contest that I am participating in."

  • Photo submissions must be original work taken by the contest entrant.
  • By entering this photo contest you are granting EcoWatch the right to use your photo on our site and our media channels in conjunction with this contest without the written permission.
  • Unless otherwise instructed, EcoWatch reserves the right to use photo submissions on our site and in our media channels aside from the contest.
  • The winner's name will be announced alongside the winning photo submission.
  • Photos that have already been submitted to other contests currently ongoing or have already won prizes in other contests are not eligible.
  • Image files created through any device capable of taking still images, such as smartphones and digital still cameras, will be accepted.
  • Color and monochrome images are valid for entry.
  • After judging concludes, the winners will be notified by email sent to their listed email address. The Patagonia eGift Card will be sent to the same listed email address.

Disclaimers

  • EcoWatch reserves the right to void entries that depict brand logos or other intellectual property, whether on electronic signs, posters, or in other forms, or that in its judgment are harmful to public order, go against standards of decency, or are conflicting to the goals of the contest.
  • EcoWatch is not responsible for the resolution of legal issues arising from the entrants' submitted photos and will not pay any costs thereby incurred.
  • EcoWatch does not bear any costs to the entrants that are incurred by entering the contest.
  • Submitted entries may not be withdrawn or returned.
  • EcoWatch reserves the right to suspend or postpone the receipt of any or all entries if it is judged that the contest is unable to be run effectively, smoothly, or without affecting the fairness of judging.

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