Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Consensus on Consensus: 97% of the World's Climate Scientists Say Humans Are Causing Climate Change

Climate

A new study confirms the expert consensus that humans are causing climate change, with a meta-analysis of research showing a convergence on the 97 percent agreement figure among climate scientists. We know how much deniers love questioning the scientific consensus, so we can only imagine how they will react to a consensus on the consensus.

Expert consensus levels from previous studies. Photo credit: John Cook

After years of attacks on John Cook's 2013 paper finding a 97 percent consensus among climate change papers and experts, Cook pulled together a dream team of other consensus paper authors to reaffirm their collective findings. This new paper was actually written in response to the latest attack that (like previous ones) misrepresents the various consensus studies in order to portray Cook’s 97 percent as an outlier.

This brief history, as well as some “on the street” interviews with the public about what percentage of climate scientists they think agree on the cause of climate change, are described by Cook in a short video while his post at the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists also discusses some motives for attacking the consensus.

For over a decade, there has been a consensus among climate scientists that climate change is man-made. While fossil-fuel funded propagandists worked to cast doubt on the reality of climate change, legitimate researchers published papers to debunk denier claims and educate the public on the state of consensus among climate scientists.

A variety of denier sources attacked these papers, clouding the public perception about the degree to which climate scientists are sure humans are causing climate change. One of those attacks spurred this particular paper, which shows the consensus between studies looking at the scientific consensus. So thanks to the constant denier attacks, we’ve reached Inception-esque levels of consensus.

Welcome to Consenception.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Top Climate Denier Turns Down $20k Bet From Bill Nye

Coal Companies’ Secret Funding of Climate Science Denial Exposed

Greenland’s Ice Melt Breaks Record, Starting Nearly Two Months Early

Is the World Bank Snatching Climate Defeat From the Jaws of Victory?

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Zak Smith

It is pretty amazing that in this moment when the COVID-19 outbreak has much of the country holed up in their homes binging Netflix, the most watched show in America over the last few weeks has been focused on wildlife trade — which scientists believe is the source of the COVID-19 pandemic. Make no mistake: Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness is about wildlife trade and other aspects of wildlife exploitation, just as surely as the appearance of Ebola, SARS, MERS, avian flu and probably COVID-19 in humans is a result of wildlife exploitation. As a conservationist, this is one of the things I've been thinking about while watching Tiger King. Here are five more:

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Hector Chapa

With the coronavirus pandemic quickly spreading, U.S. health officials have changed their advice on face masks and now recommend people wear cloth masks in public areas where social distancing can be difficult, such as grocery stores.

But can these masks be effective?

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Jörg Carstensen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Carey Gillam

Bayer AG is reneging on negotiated settlements with several U.S. law firms representing thousands of plaintiffs who claim exposure to Monsanto's Roundup herbicides caused them to develop non-Hodgkin lymphoma, sources involved in the litigation said on Friday.

Read More Show Less
Tom Werner / DigitalVision / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

With many schools now closed due to the current COVID-19 outbreak, you may be looking for activities to keep your children active, engaged, and entertained.

Although numerous activities can keep kids busy, cooking is one of the best choices, as it's both fun and educational.

Read More Show Less
In Germany's Hunsrück village of Schorbach, numerous photovoltaic systems are installed on house roofs, on Sept. 19, 2019. Thomas Frey / Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Germany's target for renewable energy sources to deliver 65% of its consumed electricity by 2030 seemed on track Wednesday, with 52% of electricity coming from renewables in 2020's first quarter. Renewable energy advocates, however, warned the trend is imperiled by slowdowns in building new wind and solar plants.

Read More Show Less