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16 Eco-Friendly Ways to Clean With Baking Soda

16 Eco-Friendly Ways to Clean With Baking Soda

You don't need strong household cleaners with toxic chemicals to keep your house tidy. Try using baking soda instead.

In its natural form, baking soda is called nahcolite, which is part of the natural mineral natron. Natron, which contains large amounts of sodium bicarbonate, has been used since ancient times to clean, according to mercola.com. It is one of the most inexpensive and safe health products around—you can buy a box of baking soda for about $1. 

Baking soda is an eco-friendly way to clean your house. Photo credit: babble.com

Here are 16 ways you can use baking soda to keep your house fresh and clean-smelling, courtesy of blogger Allison Foster:

  1. Remove grime from pet toys and bowls. Make a paste with four tablespoons of baking soda and one tablespoon of water and then scrub away with a small brush or just your fingers. Rinse well for smooth and clean bowls and toys for your pet without any harmful chemical residue.
  2. Deodorize baby bottles safely by filling the bottle with warm water and adding a teaspoon of baking soda. Swish the combo around and let it sit for a minute or too. Then rinse well.
  3. Cleaner hair is just a step away with the addition of baking soda. Sprinkle a dash or two into your daily shampoo to remove residue build up and keep your hair smelling fresh longer.
  4. Clean stuffed animals without water. Dust a handful of baking soda onto the animals and let it sit for fifteen minutes. Then dust or vacuum it off.
  5. Use as a natural alternative to denture or retainer cleaner. Fill a glass with warm water and mix in two teaspoons of baking soda. Let the dentures or retainer sit for a few hours or overnight to get clean.
  6. Stinky shoes? Sprinkle the inside of your shoes with baking soda to remove odor and wetness. Let it sit overnight and then knock out the extra powder.
  7. Degrease hairbrushes and combs by soaking overnight in a solution of warm water and baking soda. Remove hair from the brushes, then fill the sink with warm water and add a teaspoon or two of baking soda. In the morning let them air-dry.
  8. Clean your whole car, inside and out, without a scratch or scum build up. Mix a quarter cup of baking soda with a quart of warm water and wash chrome rims, vinyl seats, floor mats, upholstery, tires, windows and everything else!
  9. Remove oil or grease stains on cement, such as in the garage or on the driveway. Cover the stain with a thick layer and scrub with a wet brush.
  10. Wash your dog without water. Sprinkle on a bit of baking soda and then brush it in.
  11. Keep outdoor furniture looking great. Sprinkle on some baking soda and use a damp brush and to remove stains. Add a bit of vinegar to this scrub before storing for the season for mildew-free, new-looking furniture when the warm days roll around again.
  12. Remove scum from pool and bath toys by adding a quarter-cup of baking soda to a quart of warm water, then scrub away the slime.
  13. Clean grills by creating a paste of four parts baking soda to one part water, then scrub the grill with a wire brush. Rinse well before firing it up again.
  14. Keep clothes brighter and softer by adding a cup to your wash.
  15. Remove stains from coffee and tea pots by soaking the pot in a solution of a quarter-cup of baking soda in a quart of warm water overnight. Also works great for stained coffee mugs.
  16. Make your dishes sparkle by adding two tablespoons of baking soda to your dishwashing soap.

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