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Top 10 Reasons to Drink Tap Water

Top 10 Reasons to Drink Tap Water

EcoWatch

To put it in perspective, you can expect to pay upwards of three dollars for a bottle of water—and much more if you're at a concert or event where you aren't given much choice. The same amount of water that would cost three dollars at a store would cost you around a penny if you sourced it from your tap.

The bottled water industry thrives on the sad but true idea that perception is reality—the oldest trick in the marketer's play book. We see a bottle of water with a quaint image of a mountain spring and, consciously or not, make the connection that the water is a product from that very fictional place, conjured in some fluorescently lit office complex by a corporate art department. And in an industry not known for its tight regulatory record, there's a strong possibility that your bottled water came straight from a municipal supply anyway, same as your tap water.

But beyond the mind-boggling inflation of bottled water, how else are we paying for it? As it turns out, we're paying a lot more than we ever could have imagined bargaining for.

Thanks to TapIt, the infographic below provides 10 convincing reasons to abandon the bottle for the tap:

 

Visit EcoWatch's WATER page for more related news on this topic.

 

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